July 22, 2014
The Palestinian Resistance and Its Enemies | Jacobin
By Tariq Dana
July 21, 2014
The propaganda war against Hamas targets the legitimacy of Palestinian resistance itself.
Responding to Hamas, Islamic Jihad, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, and other resistance forces in the Gaza Strip’s rejection of the so-called “ceasefire proposal,” Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas lamented, “The Palestinian factions’ refusal to deal with the Egyptian proposal for ceasefire with Israel has disappointed all of us.”
That ceasefire called for the end of rocket attacks from the Gaza Strip, but said nothing of the Israeli occupation, siege, and blockade from which those rockets were born. It was, in other words, not a ceasefire proposal at all. With his comments, Abbas, the leader of Fatah and the chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization, distanced himself from the rest of the Palestinian factions.
Since the 2007 Hamas-Fatah conflict, the Palestinian political spectrum has polarized. Divisions between the two main factions are not merely geographical, institutional, ideological, or political. Most centrally, they run along the fault line of their conflicting agendas: resistance and anti-resistance.
Division is not new in Palestinian national politics. Political and ideological disagreements have been features of factional politics within the Palestinian national movement since its inception. However, during moments of resistance to intensified Israeli aggression, these fissures used to close up, to be replaced with a sense of unity and shared destiny.
Unfortunately, recent years have undermined this tendency. Resistance is no longer seen as a unifying umbrella under which Palestinian factions leave behind their disputes.
Western and Israeli media like to depict Abbas as a representative of the most moderate Palestinian political camp. But in the eyes of Palestinians, his hostility to the resistance makes him appear to be an unofficial spokesman of the Israeli government. That hostility is even more problematic given that he presides over a political trend that still presents itself as a “national liberation movement.”
Fatah arguably inaugurated the Palestinian resistance in 1965. It certainly dominated the PLO by the late 1960s. But since the signing of the Oslo Accords, it has abandoned the basic functions of a liberation movement. It became an exclusivist party seeking to impose its hegemony over Palestinian society, as well as monopolize political decision making, financial resources, and the means of violence.
Fatah’s irresponsible politics have diverted the PLO from its anti-colonial mission and subordinated it to the narrow interests of the Palestinian Authority elite. It has divided Palestinian society through a patronage network that has penetrated most institutions and organizations, and which serves as a mechanism of control to both co-opt potential leadership and push opposition to the margins.
Palestinian universities, historically an arena for a dynamic student movement, have become subject to PA diktat through the presence of Fatah security agents. Their role is to report on organizers’ activities, which leads both to the political arrests of students in the opposition, as well odd results in student council elections in favor of Al-Shabiba — the Fatah student movement.
Fatah’s adherence to the Oslo project and its economic normalization and security coordination with Israel have brought to the surface its divergence from the growing popular consensus that favors alternative strategies for the Palestinian national movements — ones based on resistance.
With the recent Israeli aggression on the Gaza Strip and the crackdown on protests in the West Bank protests, the PA and its ruling party have rushed, as never before, to cooperate with the Israeli occupation — a cooperation which verges on alliance. Fatah has systemically aligned itself with the most hostile regimes to resistance, and transformed Palestinian embassies around the world into hubs for plots and cooperation with foreign intelligence services.
The movement has historically contained competing trends — with political agendas that have seemed sometimes conflicting, if not contradictory. For example, during the Second Intifada, Fatah’s military wing, Al-Aqsa Brigades, played a key role in military confrontations with Israeli troops, and often deployed suicide bombers. At the same time, some of its key security leaders collaborated with the Israeli security services.
The most militant trend within Fatah in the West Bank evaporated after the arrest of its symbolic leader, Marwan Barghouti, and the domestication of its members by Abbas. Only in the Gaza Strip is the Fatah military wing still active and indeed highly critical of its mother party in the West Bank.
Fatah has adopted the most hypocritical kind of pragmatism. For example, when Western governments pressured Arafat to create the office of PA prime minister in order to reduce his power and influence, Abbas was the US favorite to occupy the post. Quickly afterward, Abbas came into conflict with Arafat over the control of the security forces, leading to Abbas’s resignation in 2003.
As a result of this incident, Abbas was seen by the majority of Fatah members as the “Karzai of Palestine,” implementing US and Israeli agendas and conspiring against Arafat. He disappeared from the political scene. However, after the death of Arafat, somehow Abbas was reborn as a heroic visionary, and the most qualified to replace Arafat as the PA president, the leader of Fatah, and the chairman of the PLO.
Given growing popular anger against the PA, several Fatah members have distanced themselves from its positions. This move has not been accompanied by critical voices demanding radical change within the movement. It is now normal to hear conflicting statements by Fatah leaders and members. But during critical moments, they appear to surrender to central decisions, even if they run counter to the core interests of the Palestinian cause.
Since the early 1990s, the Islamic Resistance Movement — Hamas — has become the main political competitor of both Fatah in particular and the secular PLO in general. Unlike Fatah, which is endorsed by Western governments, Hamas is listed as a terrorist organization. Its growing popularity in the 1990s stemmed from its fierce opposition to the Oslo Accords, which had been translated on the ground into a series of suicide bombing attacks inside Israel.
Hamas also enjoys popular support among the marginalized poor due to its well-established network of social and charitable organizations and ability to mobilize its constituents.
During the Second Intifada, Hamas joined other resistance forces in attacking Israeli troops and settlers. It also carried out massive suicide bombings inside Israel. However, by the end of the Second Intifada, Hamas began to moderate its position, hinting at accepting the two-state solution, announcing the end of suicide bombings, and declaring its willingness to join the formal political process.
In 2006, Hamas won the Palestinian legislative elections with an overwhelming majority, a victory which threatened Fatah’s historical dominance of the national movement. In response, the international community, led by the United States, boycotted the democratically elected government and halted financial aid to PA institutions.
The rising tension between Hamas and Fatah, fueled by Western and Israeli backing of Fatah, ended in a semi-civil war in the Gaza Strip in 2007 and the subsequent divide between the de facto Hamas government in the Gaza Strip and the Fatah-led PA in the West Bank.
After the Hamas takeover of the Strip, Israel imposed a crippling siege on it, waged three destructive wars on its population, and invested extensively in sustaining the Palestinian internal division.
There are many who understandably dislike Hamas’s conduct. Its dominant position in the Gaza Strip has frequently been subject to harsh criticism concerning its authoritarian mode of governance, imposition of conservative social rules, and occasional suppression of opposition groups and journalists.
However, influential resistance outfits such as the Islamic Jihad, PFLP, and even some Fatah militant branches appear to favor Hamas rule over the Gaza Strip because they are granted freedom of military training and armament.
And yet, Hamas’s participation in the 2006 elections and its later use of formal political institutions in the Gaza Strip has led some observers to argue that Hamas has begun to take the route of Fatah, and its engagement in a political process with Israel is only a matter of time.
This perception became more widely accepted when Hamas abandoned its historic regional allies — Hezbollah, Iran, and Syria — which for years had aided it militarily and bolstered it financially, and allied itself with an emergent regional axis following the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, supported by other regional actors, particularly Qatar and Turkey, under the tent of US hegemony.
However, the collapse of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and the capture of power by General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi have undermined Hamas’s power as well as its ability to govern the Gaza Strip. These events have generated an existential crisis for Hamas, forcing it to accept a reconciliation deal with Fatah that contains several concessions that would not previously have been conceivable.
Reckoning with how this happened is crucial and unavoidable. Indeed, even putting such matters to the side, many of us have over time disagreed with Hamas ideologically and politically. We still disagree, and we will continue to disagree. But in the face of Israel’s deadly aggression, it has become increasingly clear that Palestinians share the same destiny.
In such critical moments, the systematic anti-Hamas propaganda engineered by some Palestinian trends does not specifically target Hamas as an organization. It in fact targets the concept of resistance itself, as a practice, an idea, a consciousness. The alternative on offer is not resistance through different tactics. It is its antithesis, an alliance with colonialism.
For this reason, we must now be clear. It would be a mistake to perceive all the existing factional agendas as part of the national liberation movement. Supporters of the Palestinian struggle ought to be aware that by now some have proven themselves to be enemies of the Palestinian struggle for liberation and self-determination.
Tariq Dana is assistant professor of political science at Hebron University in Palestine.
Copyright © 2014 Jacobin magazine.

The Palestinian Resistance and Its Enemies | Jacobin

By Tariq Dana

July 21, 2014

The propaganda war against Hamas targets the legitimacy of Palestinian resistance itself.

Responding to Hamas, Islamic Jihad, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, and other resistance forces in the Gaza Strip’s rejection of the so-called “ceasefire proposal,” Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas lamented, “The Palestinian factions’ refusal to deal with the Egyptian proposal for ceasefire with Israel has disappointed all of us.”

That ceasefire called for the end of rocket attacks from the Gaza Strip, but said nothing of the Israeli occupation, siege, and blockade from which those rockets were born. It was, in other words, not a ceasefire proposal at all. With his comments, Abbas, the leader of Fatah and the chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization, distanced himself from the rest of the Palestinian factions.

Since the 2007 Hamas-Fatah conflict, the Palestinian political spectrum has polarized. Divisions between the two main factions are not merely geographical, institutional, ideological, or political. Most centrally, they run along the fault line of their conflicting agendas: resistance and anti-resistance.

Division is not new in Palestinian national politics. Political and ideological disagreements have been features of factional politics within the Palestinian national movement since its inception. However, during moments of resistance to intensified Israeli aggression, these fissures used to close up, to be replaced with a sense of unity and shared destiny.

Unfortunately, recent years have undermined this tendency. Resistance is no longer seen as a unifying umbrella under which Palestinian factions leave behind their disputes.

Western and Israeli media like to depict Abbas as a representative of the most moderate Palestinian political camp. But in the eyes of Palestinians, his hostility to the resistance makes him appear to be an unofficial spokesman of the Israeli government. That hostility is even more problematic given that he presides over a political trend that still presents itself as a “national liberation movement.”

Fatah arguably inaugurated the Palestinian resistance in 1965. It certainly dominated the PLO by the late 1960s. But since the signing of the Oslo Accords, it has abandoned the basic functions of a liberation movement. It became an exclusivist party seeking to impose its hegemony over Palestinian society, as well as monopolize political decision making, financial resources, and the means of violence.

Fatah’s irresponsible politics have diverted the PLO from its anti-colonial mission and subordinated it to the narrow interests of the Palestinian Authority elite. It has divided Palestinian society through a patronage network that has penetrated most institutions and organizations, and which serves as a mechanism of control to both co-opt potential leadership and push opposition to the margins.

Palestinian universities, historically an arena for a dynamic student movement, have become subject to PA diktat through the presence of Fatah security agents. Their role is to report on organizers’ activities, which leads both to the political arrests of students in the opposition, as well odd results in student council elections in favor of Al-Shabiba — the Fatah student movement.

Fatah’s adherence to the Oslo project and its economic normalization and security coordination with Israel have brought to the surface its divergence from the growing popular consensus that favors alternative strategies for the Palestinian national movements — ones based on resistance.

With the recent Israeli aggression on the Gaza Strip and the crackdown on protests in the West Bank protests, the PA and its ruling party have rushed, as never before, to cooperate with the Israeli occupation — a cooperation which verges on alliance. Fatah has systemically aligned itself with the most hostile regimes to resistance, and transformed Palestinian embassies around the world into hubs for plots and cooperation with foreign intelligence services.

The movement has historically contained competing trends — with political agendas that have seemed sometimes conflicting, if not contradictory. For example, during the Second Intifada, Fatah’s military wing, Al-Aqsa Brigades, played a key role in military confrontations with Israeli troops, and often deployed suicide bombers. At the same time, some of its key security leaders collaborated with the Israeli security services.

The most militant trend within Fatah in the West Bank evaporated after the arrest of its symbolic leader, Marwan Barghouti, and the domestication of its members by Abbas. Only in the Gaza Strip is the Fatah military wing still active and indeed highly critical of its mother party in the West Bank.

Fatah has adopted the most hypocritical kind of pragmatism. For example, when Western governments pressured Arafat to create the office of PA prime minister in order to reduce his power and influence, Abbas was the US favorite to occupy the post. Quickly afterward, Abbas came into conflict with Arafat over the control of the security forces, leading to Abbas’s resignation in 2003.

As a result of this incident, Abbas was seen by the majority of Fatah members as the “Karzai of Palestine,” implementing US and Israeli agendas and conspiring against Arafat. He disappeared from the political scene. However, after the death of Arafat, somehow Abbas was reborn as a heroic visionary, and the most qualified to replace Arafat as the PA president, the leader of Fatah, and the chairman of the PLO.

Given growing popular anger against the PA, several Fatah members have distanced themselves from its positions. This move has not been accompanied by critical voices demanding radical change within the movement. It is now normal to hear conflicting statements by Fatah leaders and members. But during critical moments, they appear to surrender to central decisions, even if they run counter to the core interests of the Palestinian cause.

Since the early 1990s, the Islamic Resistance Movement — Hamas — has become the main political competitor of both Fatah in particular and the secular PLO in general. Unlike Fatah, which is endorsed by Western governments, Hamas is listed as a terrorist organization. Its growing popularity in the 1990s stemmed from its fierce opposition to the Oslo Accords, which had been translated on the ground into a series of suicide bombing attacks inside Israel.

Hamas also enjoys popular support among the marginalized poor due to its well-established network of social and charitable organizations and ability to mobilize its constituents.

During the Second Intifada, Hamas joined other resistance forces in attacking Israeli troops and settlers. It also carried out massive suicide bombings inside Israel. However, by the end of the Second Intifada, Hamas began to moderate its position, hinting at accepting the two-state solution, announcing the end of suicide bombings, and declaring its willingness to join the formal political process.

In 2006, Hamas won the Palestinian legislative elections with an overwhelming majority, a victory which threatened Fatah’s historical dominance of the national movement. In response, the international community, led by the United States, boycotted the democratically elected government and halted financial aid to PA institutions.

The rising tension between Hamas and Fatah, fueled by Western and Israeli backing of Fatah, ended in a semi-civil war in the Gaza Strip in 2007 and the subsequent divide between the de facto Hamas government in the Gaza Strip and the Fatah-led PA in the West Bank.

After the Hamas takeover of the Strip, Israel imposed a crippling siege on it, waged three destructive wars on its population, and invested extensively in sustaining the Palestinian internal division.

There are many who understandably dislike Hamas’s conduct. Its dominant position in the Gaza Strip has frequently been subject to harsh criticism concerning its authoritarian mode of governance, imposition of conservative social rules, and occasional suppression of opposition groups and journalists.

However, influential resistance outfits such as the Islamic Jihad, PFLP, and even some Fatah militant branches appear to favor Hamas rule over the Gaza Strip because they are granted freedom of military training and armament.

And yet, Hamas’s participation in the 2006 elections and its later use of formal political institutions in the Gaza Strip has led some observers to argue that Hamas has begun to take the route of Fatah, and its engagement in a political process with Israel is only a matter of time.

This perception became more widely accepted when Hamas abandoned its historic regional allies — Hezbollah, Iran, and Syria — which for years had aided it militarily and bolstered it financially, and allied itself with an emergent regional axis following the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, supported by other regional actors, particularly Qatar and Turkey, under the tent of US hegemony.

However, the collapse of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and the capture of power by General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi have undermined Hamas’s power as well as its ability to govern the Gaza Strip. These events have generated an existential crisis for Hamas, forcing it to accept a reconciliation deal with Fatah that contains several concessions that would not previously have been conceivable.

Reckoning with how this happened is crucial and unavoidable. Indeed, even putting such matters to the side, many of us have over time disagreed with Hamas ideologically and politically. We still disagree, and we will continue to disagree. But in the face of Israel’s deadly aggression, it has become increasingly clear that Palestinians share the same destiny.

In such critical moments, the systematic anti-Hamas propaganda engineered by some Palestinian trends does not specifically target Hamas as an organization. It in fact targets the concept of resistance itself, as a practice, an idea, a consciousness. The alternative on offer is not resistance through different tactics. It is its antithesis, an alliance with colonialism.

For this reason, we must now be clear. It would be a mistake to perceive all the existing factional agendas as part of the national liberation movement. Supporters of the Palestinian struggle ought to be aware that by now some have proven themselves to be enemies of the Palestinian struggle for liberation and self-determination.

Tariq Dana is assistant professor of political science at Hebron University in Palestine.

Copyright © 2014 Jacobin magazine.

July 22, 2014
The band Massive Attack delivers solidarity message for Gaza. (via Khaled Bey)

The band Massive Attack delivers solidarity message for Gaza. (via Khaled Bey)

July 22, 2014
The Victims of Gaza: A List of 627 Palestinians Killed in Israel’s Ongoing Assault | Global Research

Updated July 22 at 6:45 pm: The Gaza health ministry has confirmed the deaths of 627 Palestinians so far in the besieged strip since Israel began its relentless assault on July 8. Among those killed, at least 158 were aged 18 or younger.

On Sunday, more than 74 people were killed in al-Shujayeh, a neighborhood east of Gaza City. According to sources in Gaza’s health ministry, 80 percent of the people killed were children under the age of 18, women, and elderly.

The youngest victim so far has been five-month-old Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum, killed by Israeli tank shelling in Rafah. The next two youngest victims were both 18 months old: Mohammed Malakiyeh was killed along with his 27-year-old mother, and Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour was killed along with a member of her family in Khan Younis. The three oldest victims were all 80 years old. Naifeh Farjallah was killed in an air strike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City, and Saber Sukkar was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City. Hijaziyah Hamid al-Helou succumbed on Sunday to wounds sustained in the bombing of her home in Gaza City on Saturday night.

Victims’ names and ages were compiled based on information released by the Gaza health ministry, while the circumstances of the deaths were taken from the ministry and local news sources.

Al-Akhbar will update the list as new information is released.

Tuesday, July 8:

1. Mohammed Sha’aban, 24, was killed in a bombing of his car in Gaza City.
2. Ahmad Sha’aban, 30, died in the same bombing.
3. Khadir al-Bashiliki, 45, died in the same bombing.
4. Rashad Yaseen, 27, was killed in a bombing of the Nusseirat refugee camp in central Gaza.
5. Riad Mohammed Kawareh, 50, was killed in a bombing of his family’s home in Khan Younis.
6. Seraj Ayad Abed al-A’al, 8, was wounded in the same bombing and succumbed to his injuries on Tuesday evening.
7. Mohammed Ayman Ashour, 15, died in the same bombing.
8. Bakr Mohammed Joudah, 22, died in the same bombing.
9. Ammar Mohammed Joudah, 26, died in the same bombing.
10. Hussein Yousef Kawareh, 13, died in the same bombing.
11. Mohammed Ibrahim Kawareh, 50, died in the same bombing.
12. Bassim Salim Kawareh, 10, died in the same bombing.
13. Mousa Habib, 16, from Gaza City’s al-Shujayeh neighborhood, was killed along with his 22-year old cousin while the pair were riding a motorcycle.
14. Mohammed Habib, 22, was killed with Mousa Habib.
15. Sakr Aysh al-Ajouri, 22, was killed in an attack on Jabalia, in northern Gaza.
16. Ahmad Na’el Mehdi, 16, from Gaza City’s Sheikh Radwan neighborhood, was killed in a bombing that wounded two of his friends.
17. Hafiz Mohammed Hamad, 30, an Islamic Jihad commander, was killed in the bombing of his home in Beit Hanoun, along with five of his family members.
18. Ibrahim Mohammed Hamad, 26, died in the same bombing.
19. Mehdi Mohammed Hamad, 46, died in the same bombing.
20. Fawzia Khalil Hamad, 62, died in the same bombing.
21. Dunia Mehdi Hamad, 16, died in the same bombing.
22. Suha Hamad, 25, died in the same bombing.
23. Suleiman Salman Abu Soaween, 22, was killed.

Wednesday, July 9:

24. Abdel Hadi Jamaat al-Sufi, 24, was killed in a bombing near the Rafah crossing.
25. Naifeh Farjallah, 80, was killed in an airstrike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City.
26. Abdel Nasser Abu Kweek, 60, was killed in the bombing of Gaza’s central governorate along with his son.
27. Khaled Abu Kweek, 31, Abdel Nasser Abu Kweek’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
28. Mohammed Areef, 13, died in a bombing in Sha’af.
28. Amir Areef, 10, died in the same bombing.
30. Mohammed Malakiyeh, 18 months old, died in a bombing along with his mother and a young man.
31. Hana Malakiyeh, 27, Mohammed Malakiyeh’s mother, died in the same bombing.
32. Hatem Abu Salem, 28, died in the same bombing.
33. Mohammed Khaled al-Nimri, 22
34. Sahar Hamdan, 40, died in the bombing of her home in Beit Hanoun.
35. Ibrahim Masri, 14, Sahar Hamdan’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
36. Mahmoud Nahid al-Nawasra was killed in a bombing in al-Meghazi.
37. Mohammed Khalaf al-Nawasra, 4, was killed in the same bombing and arrived at the hospital “in shreds.”
38. Nidal Khalaf al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 5, was killed in the same bombing.
39. Salah Awwad al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 6, was killed in the same bombing. His body was found under the rubble of the house.
40. Aisha Nijm al-Meghazi, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
41. Amal Youssef Abdel Ghafour, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
42. Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour, an 18-month-old girl, was killed in the same bombing.
43. Rashid al-Kafarneh, 30, was killed when the motorcycle he was riding was bombed.
44. Ibrahim Daoud al-Balawi, 24
45. Abdel Rahman Jamal al-Zamli, 22
46. Ibrahim Ahmad Abideen, 42
47. Mustafa Abu Mar, 20
48. Khalid Abu Mar, 23
49. Mazen Farj al-Jarbah, 30, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
50. Marwan Slim, 27, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
51. Hani Saleh Hamad, 57, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun along with his son Ibrahim.
52. Ibrahim Hamad, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
53. Salima Hassan Musallim al-Arja, 60, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded five others.
54. Maryam Atieh Mohammed al-Arja, 11, was killed in the same bombing.
55. Hamad Shahab, 37
56. Ibrahim Khalil Qanun, 24, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
57. Mohammed Khalil Qanun, 26, was killed in the same attack.
58. Hamdi Badieh Sawali, 33, was killed in the same attack.
59. Ahmad Sawali, 28, was killed in the same attack.
60. Suleiman Salim al-Astal, 55, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
61. Mohammed al-Aqqad, 24
62. Ra’ed Shalat, 37, was killed in a bombing that wounded 6 others.

Thursday, July 10:

63. Asma Mahmoud al-Hajj, 22, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that killed eight members of the same family and wounded 16 other people.
64. Basmah Abdel Fattah al-Hajj, 57, was wounded in the bombing and succumbed to her injuries shortly afterwards.
65. Mahmoud Lutfi al-Hajj, 58, died in the same bombing.
66. Tarek Mahmoud al-Hajj, 18, died in the same bombing.
67. Sa’ad Mahmoud al-Hajj, 17, died in the same bombing.
68. Najla Mahmoud al-Hajj, 29, died in the same bombing.
69. Fatima Mahmoud al-Hajj, 12, died in the same bombing.
70. Omar Mahmoud al-Hajj, 20, died in the same bombing.
71. Ahmad Salim al-Astal, 24, was killed in the bombing of a beach house in Khan Younis that critically wounded more than 15 people.
72. Mousa Mohammed al-Astal, 50, was killed in the same bombing. The two bodies were recovered four hours after the bombing.
73. Ra’ed al-Zawareh, 33, succumbed to his wounds and died. The location of his death was unreported.
74. Baha’ Abu al-Leil, 35, was killed in a bombing.
75. Salim Qandil, 27, was killed in the same bombing.
76. Omar al-Fyumi, 30, was killed in the same bombing.
77. Abdullah Ramadan Abu Ghazzal, 5, was killed in a bombing in Beit Lahiya.
78. Ismail Hassan Abu Jamah, 19, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that injured two children, one critically.
79. Hassan Awda Abu Jamah, 75, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
80. Mohammed Ahsan Ferwanah, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
81. Yasmin Mohammed Mutawwaq, 4 was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
82. Mahmoud Wulud, 26, was killed in a bombing of a civilian vehicle in northern Gaza. His remains were taken to Kamal Adwan Hospital in Jabalia.
83. Hazem Balousha, 30, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
84. Nour Rafik Adi al-Sultan, 27, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
85. Ahmad Zaher Hamdan, 24, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
86. Mohammed Kamal al-Kahlout, 25, was killed in a bombing in Jabalia.
87. Sami Adnan Shaldan, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
88. Jamah Atieh Shalouf, 25, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
89. Bassem Abdel Rahman Khattab, 6, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
90. Abdullah Mustafa Abu Mahrouk, 22, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.

Friday, July 11:

91. Anas Rizk Abu al-Kas, 33, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
92. Nour Marwan al-Najdi, 10, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
93. Mohammed Mounir Ashour, 25, was killed in a bombing on the al-Ghanam family home in Rafah.
94. Ghalia Deeb Jabr al-Ghanam, 7, was killed in the same bombing.
95. Wasim Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 23, was killed in the same bombing.
96. Mahmoud Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 26, was killed in the same bombing.
97. Kifah Shahada Deeb al-Ghanam, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
98. Ra’ed Hani Abu Hani, 31, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
99. Shahraman Ismail Abu al-Kas, 42, was killed in a bombing in a refugee camp in central Gaza.
100. Mazen Mustafa Aslan, 63, was killed in the same bombing.
101. Mohammed Rabih Abu Humeidan, 65, was killed in shelling that struck northern Gaza.
102. Abdel Halim Ashra, 54, was killed in an airstrike on Wednesday in the area of Birka Deir al-Balah, but his body wasn’t discovered until Friday.
103. Saher Abu Namous, 3, was killed in an airstrike on his home in northern Gaza.
104. Hussein al-Mamlouk, 47, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
105. Saber Sukkar, 80, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
106. Nasser Rabih Mohammed Samamah, 49, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.

Saturday, July 12:

107. Rami Abu Massaad, 23, was killed in a strike on Deir al-Balah.
108. Mohammed al-Samiri, 24, was killed in the same attack.
109. Houssam Deeb al-Razayneh, 39, was killed in an attack on Jabalia.
110. Anas Youssef Kandil, 17, was killed in the same attack.
111. Abdel Rahim Saleh al-Khatib, 38, was killed in the same attack.
112. Youssef Mohammed Kandil, 33, was killed in the same attack.
113. Mohammed Idriss Abu Saninah, 20, was killed in the same attack.
114. Hala Wishahi, 31, was killed in an attack on the Mabarra association for the disabled in Jabalia.
115. Suha Abu Saade, 38, was killed in the same attack.
116. Ali Nabil Basal, 32, was killed in a strike on western Gaza City.
117. Mohammed Bassem al-Halabi, 28, was killed in the same strike.
118. Mohammed al-Sowayti, 20, was killed in the same strike.
119. Ibrahim Nabil Humaide, 30, was killed in a bombing in the Tufah neighborhood in eastern Gaza City.
120. Hassan Ahmed Abu Ghoush, 24, was killed in the same attack.
121. Ahmed Mahmoud al-Ballaoui, 26, was killed in the same attack.
122. Ratib Sabahi al-Sifi, 22, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with five others.
123. Azmi Mahmoud Abid, 51, was killed in the same attack.
124. Nidal Mahmoud Abu al-Malish, 22, was killed in the same attack.
125. Suleiman Said Abid, 56, was killed in the same attack.
126. Ghassan Ahmad al-Masri, 25, was killed in the same attack.
127. Mustafa Mohammed Anaieh, 58, was killed in the same attack.
128. Rafa’at Youssef Amer, 36, succumbed to wounds sustained in a bombing in Gaza City.
129. Ghazi Mustafa Areef, 62, died when his home in Gaza City was bombed. His son sustained serious injuries.
130. Mohammed Adriss Abu Sulim, 20, was killed in a bombing in Jabaliya.
131. Fadi Yaqub Sakr, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
132. Qassem Jaber Adwan Awdeh, 16, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
133. Mohammed Ahmad Bassal, 19, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
134. Muhannad Youssef Dhahir, 23, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
135. Mahmoud Abdallah Shratiha, 53, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza.
136. Shadi Mohammed Zarb, 21, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded three others.
137. Imad Bassam Zarb, 21, was killed in the same bombing.
138. Nahid Ta’im al-Batash, 41, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with 16 family members. Dozens more were wounded in the same attack.
139. Baha Majid al-Batash, 28, was killed in the same bombing.
140. Qassi Isam al-Batash, 12, was killed in the same bombing.
141. Aziza Youssef al-Batash, 59 was killed in the same bombing.
142. Mohammed Isam al-Batash, 17 was killed in the same bombing.
143. Ahmad Naman al-Batash, 27 was killed in the same bombing.
144. Yahya Alaa al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
145. Jalal Majid al-Batash, 26 was killed in the same bombing.
146. Mahmoud Majid al-Batash, 22 was killed in the same bombing.
147. Marwa Majid al-Batash, 25 was killed in the same bombing.
148. Majid Subhi al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.
149. Khalid Majid al-Batash, 20 was killed in the same bombing.
150. Ibrahim Majid al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
151. Manar Majid al-Batash, 14 was killed in the same bombing.
152. Amal Hassan al-Batash, 49 was killed in the same bombing.
153. Anas Alaa al-Batash, 10 was killed in the same bombing.
154. Qassi Alaa al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.

Sunday, July 13:

155. Rami Abu Shanab, 25, succumbed to wounds sustained several days ago in Deir al-Balah.
156. Khawla al-Hawajri, 25, was killed in a bombing in Nusseirat.
157. Mohammed Ghazi Areef, 35, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
158. Ahmad Youssef Daloul, 47, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
159. Hijaziyah Hamid al-Helou, 80, succumbed to wounds sustained in the bombing of her home in Gaza City on Saturday night.
160. Fawzia Abdel A’el, 73, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
161. Haitham Ashraf Zarb, 21, succumbed to wounds sustained during an attack on Rafah on Saturday that killed two other members of the Zarb family.
162. Leila Hassan al-Awdat, 41, was killed in an attack on Meghazi that wounded four others.
163. Hussam Ibrahim al-Najjar, 14, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza. His remains were taken to Beit Hanoun Hospital.
164. Rawidah Abu Harb al-Zwaida, 31, was killed.
165. Samer Tallal Hamdan was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
166. Hussein Abd al-Qadir Muheisen, 19, succumbed to wounds sustained in Gaza City.
167. Maher Thabit Abu Mar, 24, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
168. Mohammed Salim Abu Bureis, 65, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
169. Saddam Moussa Moamar, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
170. Mousa Shehade Moamar, 60, was killed in Khan Younis.
171. Hanadi Hamadi Moamar, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
172. Adham Mohammed Abed al-Fatah Abed al-Al was killed in Gaza.

Monday, July 14:

173. Qassem Tallal Hamdan, 23, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
174. Hamid Suleiman Abu al-Araj Deir al-Balah, 60.
175. Abdullah Mahmoud Barakah, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
176. Tamer Salem Kodeih, 37, was killed in Khan Younis.
177. Ziad Maher al-Najjar, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
178. Ziad Salem al-Shawi, 25, was killed in Rafah.
179. Mohammed Yasser Hamdan, 24, was killed in Gaza.
180. Mohammed Shakib al-Agha, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
181. Mohammed Younis Abu Youssif, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
182. Sara Omar Sheikh al-Eid, 4, was killed in Rafah.
183. Omar Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 24, was killed in Rafah.
184. Jihad Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 48, was killed in Rafah.
185. Kamal Ated Youssif Abu Taha, 16, was killed in Khan Younis.
186. Ismail Nabil Ahmad Abu Hatab, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.

Tuesday, July 15:

187. Ahmad Younis Abu Youssif, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
188. Bushra Khalil Zoarob, 53, was killed in Rafah.
189. Atwa Amira al-Maamour, 63, was killed in Khan Younis.
190. Ismail Salim al-Najjar, 46, was killed in Khan Younis.
191. Mohammed Ahmad Ibrahim al-Najjar, 49, was killed in Khan Younis.
192. Suleiman Abu Louli, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
193. Sobhi Abdel Hamid Moussa, 77, was killed in Khan Younis.
194. Ismail Ftouh, 24, was killed in Gaza.
195. Saleh Said Dahliz Rafah, 20, was killed in Rafah.
196. Yasser Abdel Mahmoun, 18, was killed in Rafah.
197. Ibrahim Khalil al-Asaafi, 66, was killed in Jiher el-Deek.
198. Mohammed Abdullah al-Zahouk, 23, was killed in Rafah.
199. Mohammed Ismail Abu Awda, 27, was killed in Rafah.

Wednesday, July 16:

200. Mohammed Sabri al-Dibari, 20, was killed in Rafah.
201. Abdullah Mohammed Abdullah al-Irjani, 19, was killed in Khan Younis.
202. Ahmad Adel Ahmad al-Niwajha, 23, was killed in Rafah.
203. Mohammed Tayseer Sharab, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
204. Farid Mohammed Abu Daqa, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
205. Ashraf Khalil Abu Shanab, 33, was killed in Rafah.
206. Khadra al-Abd Salama Abu Daqa, 65, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
207. Omar Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 24, was killed in the same attack.
208. Ibrahim Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 10, was killed in the same attack.
209. Abdel Rahman Ibrahim Khalil al-Sarkhi, 37, was killed in an attack on Gaza City.
210. Ahed Atef Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
211. Zakaria Ahed Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
212. Mohammed Ramez Bakr, 11, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
213. Ismail Mohammed Bakr, 9, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
214. Hamza Ra’ed Thari, 6, succumbed to wounds sustained “a few days ago” and passed away.
215. Mohammed Akram Abu Amer, 34, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
216. Kamal Mohammed Abu Amer, 38, Mohammed’s brother, was reported seriously injured and then dead in the same attack.
217. Raqia al-Astal, 70, was killed in the bombing of a mosque in Khan Younis which killed at least three others and critically wounded several children.
218. Yasmin al-Astal, 4, was killed in the same attack.
219. Hussein Abdel Nasser al-Astal, 23, was killed in the same attack.
220. Usama Mahmoud al-Astal, 6, was critically wounded in the same attack and succumbed to his wounds shortly afterwards.
221. Hossam Shamlakh, 23, succumbed to wounds sustained in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.
222. Mohammed Kamal Abdel Rahman, 30, was killed in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.

Thursday, July 17:

223. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Qadim, 22, succumbed to wounds sustained in Deir al-Balah.
224. Zeinab Mohammed Saeed al-Abadleh, 70, died of her wounds in the Gaza European hospital.
225. Mohammed Abdel Rahman Hassouneh, 67, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
226. Mohammed Ahmad al-Hout, 41, was killed in the same attack while on his way to morning prayers.
227. Ahmad Rihan, 23, was killed in an attack on North Gaza.
228. Salam Salah Fayyad, 25, succumbed to his wounds in a hospital in Gaza’s central province.
229. Abdallah al-Akhras, 27, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
230. Bashir Abd al-A’el, 20, was killed in the same attack.
231. Mohammed Ziyad Ghanem, 25, was killed in the same attack.
232. Fulla Tarek Shaheber, 8, was killed along with two child relatives in an airstrike on their home in Gaza City.
233. Jihad Issam Shaheber, 10, was killed in the same strike.
234. Wassim Issam Shaheber, 9, was killed in the same strike.
235. Yassin al-Humaideh, 4, died of wounds suffered in an earlier attack on Gaza City.
236. Rahaf Khalil al-Jabbour, 4, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
237. Hamza Houssam al-Abadaleh, 29, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
238. Abed Ali Natiz, 26, was killed in Gaza.
239. Mohammed Salem Natiz, 4, was killed in Gaza City.
240. Mohammed Shadi Natiz, 15, was killed in Gaza City.
241. Salah Salah al-Shafiai was killed in Khan Younis.
242. Majdi Suleiman Salamah Jabarah, 22, was killed in Rafah.
243. Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum, 5 months old, was killed in Rafah.

Friday, July 18:

244. Nassim Mahmoud Nassir was killed in an attack on Beit Hanoun.
245. Karam Mahmoud Nassir was killed in the same attack.
246. Omar Ayyad al-Mahmoum, 18, from Rafah, was killed in an attack on al-Shawka.
247. Salmiah Suleiman Ghayyad, 70, was killed in an attack east of Rafah.
248. Rami Saqqer Abu Tawila was killed in an attack east of al-Shujayeh that wounded 7 of his family members.
249. Hamad Abu Lahyia, 23, was killed in an attack east of Qarara that critically wounded several others.
250. Bassem Mohammed Mahmoud Madi, 22, was killed in an attack east of Rafah that wounded 11 others.
251. Mohammed Abdel Fattah Rashad Fayyad, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
252. Mahmoud Mohammed Fayyad, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
253. Bilal Mahmoud Radwan, 23, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
254. Mundhir Radwan, 22, was killed in the same attack.
255. Ahmad Fawzia Radwan, 23, was killed in the same attack.
256. Mahmoud Fawzia Radwan, 24, was killed in the same attack.
257. Ismail Youssef Taha Qassim, 59, was killed in an attack in Beit Hanoun that wounded 25 others.
258. Amal Khadir Ibrahim Badour, 40, was killed in the same attack.
259. Hani As’ad Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis that killed his nephew and wounded 4 others.
260. Mohammed Hamdan Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in the same attack.
261. Hussam Muslim Abu Eissa, 26, was killed in Jahr al-Dik.
262. Walaa Abu Ismail Muslim,12, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
263. Mohammed Abu Muslim, 13, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
264. Ahmad Abu Muslim, 14, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
265. Ahmed Abdullah al-Bahnasawi, 25, was killed in the village of Om al-Nasr in Gaza.
266. Saleh Zaghidi, 20, was killed in Rafah.
267. Alaa Abu Shbat, 23, was killed in Rafah.
268. Ahmed Hasan Saleh al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in al-Fakhari.
269. Hamada Abdallah al-Bashiti, 21, was killed in al-Fakhari.
270. Abdullah Jamal al-Samiri, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
271. Mahmoud Ali Darwish, 40, was killed in Nusseirat.
272. Wila al-Qara, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
273. Raafat Mohammed al-Bahloul, 35, was killed in Khan Younis.
274. Mohammed Awad Matar, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
275. Hamza Mohammed Abu al-Hussein, 27, was killed in Rafah.
276. Imad Hamed Alouwein, 7, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
277. Qassem Hamed Alouwein, 4, was killed in the same strike.
278. Sara Mohammed Boustan, 13, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
279. Rizk Ahmed al-Hayek, 2, was killed in Gaza City.
280. Mohammed Saad Mahmoud Abu Saade, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
281. Naim Moussa Abu Jarad, 24, was killed in tank shelling on his home in Beit Hanoun along with seven members of his family.
282. Abed Moussa Abu Jarad, 30, was killed in the same attack.
283. Siham Moussa Abu Jarad, 15, was killed in the same attack.
284. Rijaa Alyan Abu Jarad, 31, was killed in the same attack.
285. Ahlam Naim Abu Jarad, 13, was killed in the same attack.
286. Hania Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 3, was killed in the same attack.
287. Samih Naim Abu Jarad, 1, was killed in the same attack.
288. Moussa Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 6, was killed in the same attack.
289. Moustafa Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in an air strike on Rafah along with two relatives.
290. Imad Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in the same attack.
291. Nizar Fayez Abu Sanina, 38, was killed in the same attack.
292. Ghassan Salem Moussa, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
293. Mohammed Salem Shaat, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
294. Ahmed Salem Shaat, 22, was killed in the same attack.
295. Amjad Salem Shaat, 15, was killed in the same attack.
296. Mohamed Talal al-Sanaa, 20, was killed in Rafah.

Saturday, July 19:

297. Ayad Ismail al-Rakib, 26, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
298. Yehya Bassam al-Sirri, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
299. Mohammed Bassam al-Sirri, 17, was killed in the same attack.
300. Mahmoud Redda Salhia, 56, was killed in Khan Younis.
301. Moustafa Redda Salhia, 21, was killed in the same attack.
302. Mohammed Moustafa Salhia, 22, was killed in the same attack.
303. Wissam Redda Salhia, 15, was killed in the same attack.
304. Ibrahim Jamal Kamal Nasser, 13, was killed in Khan Younis.
305. Ahmed Mahmoud Hassan Aziz, 34, Khan Younis.
306. Said Ola Issa, 30, was killed in the central disrict.
307. Mohammed Awad Fares Nassar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
308. Mohammed Jihad al-Kara, 29, was killed in Khan Younis.
309. Rashdi Khaled Nassar, 24, was killed in the same Khan Younis.
310. Raed Walid Likan, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
311. Raafat Ali Bahloul, 36, was killed in Khan Younis.
312. Bilal Ismail Abu Daqqah, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
313. Mohammed Ismail Samour, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
314. Ismail Ramadan al-Lawalhi, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
315. Mohammed Ziad al-Rahhel, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
316. Mohammed Ahmed Abu Zaanounah, 36, was killed in Gaza.
317. Mohammed Rafic al-Rahhel, 22, was killed in Beit Lahia.
318. Fadel Mohammed al-Banna, 29. was killed in Jbalia.
319. Mohammed Atallah Awdeh Saadat, 25, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
320. Mohammed Abedel Rahman Abu Hamad, 25, was killed in Beit Lahia.
321. Maali Abedel Rahman Suleiman Abu Zayed, 24, al-Wista.
322. Mahmoud Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 23, was killed in Beit Lahia.
323. Dalia Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
324. Ruaia Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
325. Nagham Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 2, was killed in Beit Lahia.
326. Amer Hamoudah, 7, was killed in Beit Lahia.
327. Mahmoud Rizk Mohammed Hamoudah, 18, was killed in Beit Lahia.
328. Mohammed Khaled Jamil al-Zuweidi, 20, was killed in Beit Lahia.
329. Mohammed Ahmad al-Saidi, 18, was killed in Khan Younis.
330. Abdel Rahman Mohammed Awdah Barak, 23, al-Wista.
331. Tarek Samir Khalil al-Hitto, 26, was killed in al-Wista.
332. Mahmoud al-Sharif, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
333. Mohammed Fathi al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
334. Mahmoud Anwar Abu Shabab, 16, was killed in Rafah.
335. Mo’men Taysir al-Abed Abu Dan, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
336. Abdel Aziz Samir Abu Zeiter, 31, was killed in al-Wista.
337. Mohammed Ziad Zaabout, 24, was killed in Gaza.
338. Hatem Ziadah Zaabout, 22, was killed in Gaza.
339. Ahmad Maher Mohammed Abu Thuria, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
340. Abdullah Ghazi Abdullah al-Masri, 30, was killed in al-Wista.
341. Ayman Hisham al-Naaouq, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
342. Akram Mahmoud al-Matwouk, 37, was killed in Jabalia.
343. Salem Ali Abu Saadah was killed in Khan Younis.

Sunday, July 20:

344. Hosni Mahmoud al-Absi, 56, was killed in Rafah.
345. Mohammed Mahmoud Moamar, 30, was killed in Rafah,
346. Hamza Mahmoud Moamar, 21, was killed in Rafah.
347. Anas Mahmoud Moamar, 17, was killed in rafah.
348. Mohammed Ali Jundieh, 38, was killed in Gaza.
349. Mohammed Khalil al-Hayyah
350. Osama Khalil al-Hayyah
351. Khalil Osama al-Hayyah
352. Hala Saqer Abu Hin
353. Fahmi Abdel Aziz Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Wista.
354. Ahmad Tawfiq Zannoun, 26, was killed in Rafah.
355. Sohaib Ali Jomaa Abu Qoura, 21, was killed in Rafah.
356. Homeid Sobh Mohammed Abu Foujo, 22, was killed in Rafah.
357. Toufic Marshoud, 52, was killed in Gaza.
358. Ibrahim Khalil Abd Ammar, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
359. Ibrahim Salim Joumea al-Sahbani, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
360. Ibrahim Arrif Ibrahim al-Ghalayini, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
361. Osama Khalil Ismail al-Hayya, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
362. Osama Roubhi Shahta Ayyad, 31, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
363. Isra Yassir Atieh Hamidieh, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
364. Akram Mohammed Ali al-Skafi, 63, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
365. Iman Khalil Abed Ammar, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
366. Iman Mohammed Ibrahim Hamadeh, 40, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
367. Ahmad Ishaq Youssef al-Ramlawi, 33, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
368. Ahmad Sammi Diab Ayyad, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
369. Ahmad Mohammed Ahmad Abu Zanouna, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
370. Imama Isama Khalil al-Hayya, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
371. Talla Akram Ahmad al-Atwi, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
372. Tawfiq Ibrawi Salem Marshoud, 52, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
373. Hatim Ziad Ali al-Zabout, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
374. Khalid Riyad Mohammed Hamad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
375. Khadija Ali Moussa Shahadi, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
376. Khalil Osama Khalil al-Hayya, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
377. Khalil Salim Ibrahim Mousbah, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
378. Dima Adil Abdullah Aslim, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
379. Dina Rushdi Omar Hamadi, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
380. Rahaf Akram Ismail Abu Joumea, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
381. Saji Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
382. Samia Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 3, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
383. Soad Mohammed Abdel Razik al-Hallaq, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
384. Samar Osama Khalil al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
385. Shadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
386. Shireen Fathi Othman Ayyad, 18, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
387. Adil Abdullah Salim Aslim, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
388. Assem Khalil Abed Ammar, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
389. Ahed Saed Moussa al-Sirsik, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
390. Ayisha Ali Mahmoud Zayid, 54, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
391. Abdel Rahman Akram Mohammed al-Skafi, 22, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
392. Abdel Rahman Abdel Razak Abdel Rahman al-Shaykh Khalil, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
393. Abdullah Mansour Radwan Ammara, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
394. Abed Rabboh Ahmad Mohammed Zayid, 58, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
395. Isam Atieh Said al-Skafi, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
396. Ola Ziad Hassan Aslim, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
397. Alaa Jamal al-Din Mohammed Bourda, 35, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
398. Ali Mohammed Hassan al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
399. Omar Jamil Soubhi Hammouda, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
400. Ghada Soubhi Sa’adi Ayyad, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
401. Ghada Ibrahim Suleiman Udwan, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
402. Fadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
403. Fatima Abdel Rahim Abdel Qadir Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
404. Fida’a Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
405. Fahmi Abdel Aziz Sa’ed Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
406. Qinan Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
407. Maysa Abdel Rahman Said al-Sirsawi, 37, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
408. Mohammed Ashraf Rafiq Ayyad, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
409. Mohammed Hassan Mohammad al-Skafi, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
410. Mohammed Rami Fathi Ayyad, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
411. Mohammed Ra’ed Ihsan Aqqila, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
412. Mohammed Ziad Ali al-Zabbout, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
413. Mohammed Mohammed Ali Muharrib Jundiyah, 38, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
414. Mohammed Hani Mohammad al-Halaq, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
415. Marrah Shakil Ahmad al-Jammal, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
416. Marwan Mounir Saleh Qunfud, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
417. Marwa Salman Ahmad al-Sirsawi, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
418. Moussaeb al-Khayr Salah al-Din Said al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
419. Mona Suleiman Ahmad al-Sheikh Khalil, 49, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
420. Mona Abdel Rahman Mahmoud Ayyad, 42, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
421. Nirmin Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
422. Hala Akram Hassan al-Hallaq, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
423. Hala Soubhi Saidi Ayyad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
424. Hala Saqr Hassan al-Hayya, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
425. Hani Mohammed Ahmad al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
426. Hiba Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
427. Youssef Ahmad Younis Mustafa, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
428. Youssef Salim Hamto Habib, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
429. Unknown
430. Mohammed Ayman al-Shaer, 5, was killed in Khan Younis.
431. Leila Hasan al-Shaer, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
432. Salah Saleh al-Shaer, in his forties, was killed in Khan Younis.
433. Hibatullah Akram al-Shaer, 7, was killed in Khan Younis.
434. Youssef Sha’aban Ziyadeh, 44, was killed in al-Barij.
435. Jamil Sha’aban Ziyadeh, 53, was killed in the same attack.
436. Sha’aban Jamil Ziyadeh, 12, was killed in the same attack.
437. Omar Sha’aban Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
438. Muftiya Mohammed Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
439. Bayyan Abdel Latif Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
440. Ismail al-Qurdi
441. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Muqadama, 30, was killed in the same attack.
442. Najah Sa’ad al-Din Daraji, 65, was killed in Rafah.
443. Abdullah Youssef Daraji, 3, was killed in the same attack.
444. Mohammed Baghdar al-Dughma, 20, was killed in Beni Soheileh.
445. Mohammed Raja’ Mohammed Handam, 15, was killed in Rafah.
446. Aya Bahjat Abu Sultan, 15, was killed in Beit Lahya.
447. Hani Mohammed al-Halaq, 29, was killed in al-Ramal.
448. Suad Mohammed al-Halaq, 62, was killed in the same attack.
449. Qinan Akram al-Halaq, 5, was killed in the same attack.
450. Samar Osama al-Halaq, 29, was killed in the same attack.
451. Saji al-Halaq was killed in the same attack.
452. Ibrahim Khalil Ammar was killed in the same attack.
453. Ahmad Yassin was killed in the same attack.
454. Rayan Taysir Abu Jamea, 8, was killed in Khan Younis.
455. Fatima Mahmoud Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
456. Sabah Tawfiq Mahmoud Abu Jamea, 38, was killed in the same attack.
457. Rozan Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 14, was killed in the same attack. Her body was recovered from the rubble on Monday.
458. Jawdat al-Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
459. Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 5, was killed in the same attack.
460. Haifa Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 9, was killed in the same attack.
461. Yasmin Ahmad Salama Abu Jamea, 25, was killed in the same attack.
462. Suheila Bassam Ahmad Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
463. Shahinaz Walid Ahmad Abu Jamea, 1, was killed in the same attack.
464. Hossam Hossam Abu Qaynas, 5, was killed in the same attack.
465. An unidentified woman was killed in the same attack.
466. An unidentified woman in her 30s was killed in the same attack.
467. An unidentified child was killed in the same attack.
468. Ahmad Suleiman Mahmoud Sahmoud, 34, was killed in the same attack.
469. Minwa Abdel Bassit Ahmad al-Sabea, 37, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
470. Mahmoud Moussa Abu Anzar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
471. Turkiyah al-Abed al-Biss
472. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
473. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
474. Abdullah Omar al-Maghribi was killed in Rafah.
475. Najah al-Maghribi was killed in the same attack.
476. Bassem al-Brayim was killed in Khan Younis.
477. Ra’ed Mansour Nayfeh was killed in Gaza City.
478. Fuad Jaber was killed in Gaza City.
479. Mohammed Mahmoud Hussein Moammar was killed in Rafah.
480. Hamza Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
481. Anas Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
482. Bilal Jaber Mohammed al-Ashhab, 22, was killed in al-Mughraqa.
483. An unidentified body was recovered along with Bilal.
484. Ra’ed Ismail al-Bardawil, 26, was killed in Rafah.
485. Unknown
486. Unknown
487. Unknown
488. Unknown
489. Unknown
490. Unknown
491. Unknown
492. Unknown

Monday, July 21:

493. Sumoud Nasr Siyam, 26, was killed in Rafah.
494. Mohammed Mahrous Salam Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
495. Badr Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
496. Ahmad Ayman Mahrous Siyam, 17, was killed in the same attack.
497. Mustafa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 12, was killed in the same attack.
498. Ghaydaa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
499. Shireen Mohammed Salam Siyam, 32, was killed in the same attack.
500. Dalal Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
501. Kamal Mahrous Salama Siyam, 27, was killed in the same attack.
502. Abdullah Trad Abu Hjeir, 16, was killed in Nusseirat.
503. Ahmad Moussa Shaykh al-Eid, 23, was killed in Rafah.
504. Zakariah Massoud al-Ashqar, 24, was killed in Gaza City.
505. Kamal Talal Hassan al-Masri, 22, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
506. Ra’ed Isam Daoud, 30, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
507. Fatima Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
508. Ahmad Mohammed Azzam, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
509. Mahmoud Hassan al-Nakhala was killed in Gaza.
510. Kamal Massoud, 21, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
511. Saleh Badawi, 31, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
512. Unidentified body in the Gaza European hospital.
513. Majdi Mahmoud al-Yazaji, 56, was killed in Gaza City.
514. Mohammed Samih al-Ghalban was killed in Gaza City.
515. Karam Ibrahim Atieh Barham, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
516. Nidal Ali Abu Daqqa, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
517. Nidal Joumea Abu Assi, 43, was killed in Khan Younis.
518. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
519. Mayar al-Yazaji, 2, was killed in al-Karama.
520. Yasmin al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
521. Wajdi al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
522. Safinaz al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
523. Unidentified child, 5, was killed in the same attack.
524. Mahran Kamel Jondeyah, 32, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
525. Tamer Nayef Jondeyah, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
526. Rahma Ahmad Jondeyah, 50, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
527. Ibrahim Shaaban Bakroun, 37, was killed in al-Shaaf
528. An unidentified person was killed in the Israeli shelling of Al Aqsa Martyrs Hospital. The attack killed three others and wounded 50.
529. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
530. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
531. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
532. Youssef Ghazi Hamidieh, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
533. Moataz Jamal Hamidieh, 18, was killed in the same attack.
534. Aed Jamal Hamidieh, 21, was killed in the same attack.
535. Aya Yasser al-Qassas was killed in Gaza City.
536. Aesha Yasser al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
537. Nasma Iyad al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
538. Lamyaa Iyad al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
539. Israa al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
540. Yasmin al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
541. Arwa al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
542. Aliaa al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
543. Fayza al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
544. Soumaya al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
545. Fatima Ahmad al-Arja was killed in Rafah.
546. Atieh Youssef Dardouna, 26, was killed in Jabalia.
547. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
548. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
549. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
550. Fadi Azmi Brayaem was killed in Deir al-Balah.
551. Othman Salem Brayaem was killed in the same attack.
552. Salem Abdel Majeed Brayaem was killed in the same attack.
553. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza City.
554. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza City.
555. Ibrahim Dib Ahmad al-Kilani, 53, was killed in a strike on Israa tower in Gaza City along with his wife and their five children. Four members of his wife’s family were also killed in the attack.
556. Taghrid Shaaban Mohammed al-Kilani, 45, was killed in the same attack.
557. Yaser Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 8, was killed in the same attack.
558. Elias Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 4, was killed in the same attack.
559. Sawsan Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 11, was killed in the same attack.
560. Rim Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 12, was killed in the same attack.
561. Yaseen Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 9, was killed in the same attack.
562. Mahmoud Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 37, was killed in the same attack.
563. Aida Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 47, was killed in the same attack.
564. Soura Shaaban mohammed Derbas, 41, was killed in the same attack.
565. Inas Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 30, was killed in the same attack.
566. Jihad Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
567. Fadi Bashir al-Abadleh, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
568. Unknown
569. Unknown
570. Unknown

Tuesday, July 22:

571. Wael Jamal Harb, 32, was killed in Gaza.
572. Hasan Khodor Bakr, 60, was killed in Gaza.
573. Mahmoud Suleiman Abu Sobha, 55, was killed in Khan Younis.
574. Abdullah Ismail al-Bahisi, 27, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
575. Misaab Saleh Salameh, 19, was killed in Khan Younis.
576. Mohammed Nasr Haroun, 38, was killed in al-Nsayrat.
577. Naji Jamal al-Fajm, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
578. Ibtihal Ibrahim al-Rimahi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
579. Youssef Ibrahim al-Rimahi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
580. Iman Ibrahim al-Rimahi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
581. Salwa Abu Monifi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
582. Samira Abu Monifi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
583. Haytham Samir al-Agha, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
584. Walid Suleiman Abu Daher, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
585. Yasmin Ahmad Abu Mor, 25, was killed in Rafah.
586. Sameh Zahir al-Sowafiri, 29, was killed in Rafah.
587. Mohammed Moussa Abu Fayad, 36, was killed in Rafah.
588. Fatima Hasan Azzam, 70, was killed in al-Zaytoun.
589. Maryam Hasan Azzam, 50, was killed in al-Zaytoun.
590. Unknown
591. Unknown
592. Unknown
593. Unknown
594. Unknown
595. Unknown
596. Unknown
597. Unknown
598. Unknown
599. Unknown
600. Unknown
601. Unknown
602. Unknown
603. Unknown
604. Unknown
605. Unknown
606. Soha Naim al-Kharwat, 25, was killed in north Gaza along with her daughter Mona. She was pregnant.
607. Mona Rami al-Kharwat, 4, was killed in the same attack.
608. Ahmad Salah abu Sido, 17, was killed in al-Mahatta.
609. Mahmoud Slim Mostafa Daraj, 22, was killed in Jabalia.
610. Ibrahim Sobhi al-Firi, 25, was killed in Beit Lahia.
611. Ahmad Assaad al-Boudi, 24, was killed in Beit Lahia.
612. Unknown was killed in Beit Lahia.
613. Unknown was killed in al-Braij camp.
614. Unknown was killed in al-Braij camp.
615. Unknown was killed in al-Braij camp.
616. Hasan Shaaban Khamisi, 28, was killed in al-Maghazi camp.
617. Tareq Fayeq Hajjaj, 22, was killed in Gaza.
618. Ahmad Ziad Hajjaj, 21, was killed in the same attack.
619. Mohammed Shahadeh Hajjaj, 31, was killed in the same attack.
620. Fayza Saleh Abdul Rahman Hajjaj, 66, was killed in the same attack.
621. Rawan Ziad Hajjaj, 15, was killed in the same attack.
622. Youssef Mohammed Hajjaj, 28, was killed in the same attack.
623. Hakema Nafea Abu Edwan, 75, was killed in Rafah.
624. Najah Nafea Abu Edwan, 85, was killed in the same attack.
625. Misaab Nafeth al-Ajala, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
626. Khalaf Atieh Abu Sanima, 18, was killed in Rafah.
627. Khalil Atieh Abu Sanima, 20, was killed in the same attack.

July 22, 2014
A Palestinian woman covered in relatives blood, cries at a Gaza hospital. Helplessness is the worst of all feelings. (via Asem Khalil)

A Palestinian woman covered in relatives blood, cries at a Gaza hospital. Helplessness is the worst of all feelings. (via Asem Khalil)

July 22, 2014
"In 14 days, Israel has killed 573 Palestinians and injured another 3554. So more than 100 Palestinians slaughtered in 1 day, is that right?"

Rania Khalek

July 22, 2014

(Source: momo33me)

July 20, 2014
journalofanobody:

Rick Amor, The Dog, 1989   

journalofanobody:

Rick Amor, The Dog, 1989   

July 20, 2014
brendantheblob:

Flows and Flows
LAX/TXL, an exhibition curated by Thinkspace for Urban Nation, Berlin.

brendantheblob:

Flows and Flows

LAX/TXL, an exhibition curated by Thinkspace for Urban Nation, Berlin.

July 20, 2014
free-parking:

Fragment of the face of a queen, yellow jasper, c. 1353–1336 B.C. Middle Egypt

free-parking:

Fragment of the face of a queen, yellow jasper, c. 1353–1336 B.C. Middle Egypt

July 20, 2014
magnificentruin:

Joel SternfeldWet’n Wild Aquatic Theme Park, Orlando, Florida, September 1980

magnificentruin:

Joel Sternfeld
Wet’n Wild Aquatic Theme Park,
Orlando, Florida, September 1980