September 21, 2014
oldoils:

The Enigma (detail) Gustave Dore - 1871

oldoils:

The Enigma (detail)
Gustave Dore - 1871

September 21, 2014
danielefummo:

photo: daniele fummo
vivienne westwood red label ss15 | backstage, london 2014

danielefummo:

photo: daniele fummo

vivienne westwood red label ss15 | backstage, london 2014

September 21, 2014
adambirkan:

©Adam Birkan

adambirkan:

©Adam Birkan

September 21, 2014
marcelburckhardt:

"United Hands" © Marcel Burckhardt Photography

marcelburckhardt:

"United Hands"
© Marcel Burckhardt Photography

September 21, 2014
kent-andreasen:

A Blind Great Dane

kent-andreasen:

A Blind Great Dane

September 21, 2014
tinei:

2014. I collect my tears, 84 x 60 cm,  Oil on paper

tinei:

2014. I collect my tears, 84 x 60 cm,  Oil on paper

September 21, 2014
aestheticess:

Shawn Bradford

aestheticess:

Shawn Bradford

September 21, 2014

(Source: fluid--druid)

September 21, 2014
stylinglikeitsthe90s:

TLC wearing Tommy Hilfiger, one of the most popular brands during the 90s

stylinglikeitsthe90s:

TLC wearing Tommy Hilfiger, one of the most popular brands during the 90s

September 21, 2014
decadentlullaby:

When women used to be depressed or were not “taking care of their men” properly their husbands could send them to the psych ward for attitude adjustments. This was part of conditioning them to always wear a smile. They believed that if a woman saw herself smiling that it would become natural practice and that she would be “cured”. This often went along with shock therapies. 
I found this post on Facebook with comments made by people with loved ones who wore these for the reasons mentioned above. After finding this story, I did a Google search and found out about a school in Budapest that used these masks for treatment of depression after World War 2. So yes, these stories are true.

decadentlullaby:

When women used to be depressed or were not “taking care of their men” properly their husbands could send them to the psych ward for attitude adjustments. This was part of conditioning them to always wear a smile. They believed that if a woman saw herself smiling that it would become natural practice and that she would be “cured”. This often went along with shock therapies.

I found this post on Facebook with comments made by people with loved ones who wore these for the reasons mentioned above. After finding this story, I did a Google search and found out about a school in Budapest that used these masks for treatment of depression after World War 2. So yes, these stories are true.