March 9, 2013
Hugo Chavez: How he brought heating oil to Native Americans | Censored News
Native Americans Lost an Ally
By Robert Free GalvanCensored News
March 6, 2013
We lost an ally! May he rest in peace President Hugo Chavez. He supported indigenous rights by naming many indigenous people to high positions. Dr Noli Fernandez of the Wyuu Tribe as Minister of Indigenous Health. He also supported the election of the first indigenous Governor for the province of Amazonia. I share this story: Venezuela hosted the world gathering of youth and students in Caracas 2005. We went to the 1973 gathering in East Berlin with 10 others after Wounded Knee 1973. We met the Sammi people of Norway there. We spoke of the indigenous struggle and the need to protect Mother earth. I got into a fight with communist, Leninist, Maoist, and every other kind of left wings, when I stated I saw no difference between Capitalist and Communist when it came to how they treat our Mother earth. The gatherings are held every 5 years somewhere on the globe. In 2005, Caracas hosted and I went to see if things had changed and quickly got into the same argument with Communist at a rally.  President Hugo Chavez was about to speak. Chavez security took me into their offices and asked why I was in the heated argument with the American Communist Party leaders. They had promised me a table to put out Indian struggles, a time to speak I told them and to show a powerpoint of these struggles. After viewing my powerpoint, they stated if they had seen it 10 minutes earlier, it would have been the back drop for President Chavez speech on US imperialism. They quickly apologized for the way that I had been treated by the USA Communist and asked if I would join the special seats by President Chavez. They asked if I was hungry, (YES I was) and brought me food. From up on the platform by Chavez I turned and saw all the communists and flipped them the bird.President Chavez started his speech. Later, when back home, I was contacted by the Venezuelan Embassy and asked what I thought of their country. I had seen great efforts for the poor and great respect for indigenous people, and I asked if they could share their wealth in heating oil for the tribes and poor in the USA. President Chavez accepted this challenge and had Citgo oil company of Venezuela work with Embassy staff to implement. They called me one night in December 2005 and asked which tribes were ready to receive and I directed them to the 4 tribes of Maine as the first to receive what would eventually be part of the 40 million gallons of heating oil to tribes and poor across USA. That was the ally we had!
Copyright © 2013 Censored News.
[Photo: Hugo Chavez. (© Robert Free Galvan)]

Hugo Chavez: How he brought heating oil to Native Americans | Censored News

Native Americans Lost an Ally

By Robert Free Galvan
Censored News

March 6, 2013

We lost an ally! May he rest in peace President Hugo Chavez. He supported indigenous rights by naming many indigenous people to high positions. Dr Noli Fernandez of the Wyuu Tribe as Minister of Indigenous Health. He also supported the election of the first indigenous Governor for the province of Amazonia.
I share this story:
Venezuela hosted the world gathering of youth and students in Caracas 2005.
We went to the 1973 gathering in East Berlin with 10 others after Wounded Knee 1973. We met the Sammi people of Norway there. We spoke of the indigenous struggle and the need to protect Mother earth. I got into a fight with communist, Leninist, Maoist, and every other kind of left wings, when I stated I saw no difference between Capitalist and Communist when it came to how they treat our Mother earth. The gatherings are held every 5 years somewhere on the globe.
In 2005, Caracas hosted and I went to see if things had changed and quickly got into the same argument with Communist at a rally.  President Hugo Chavez was about to speak. Chavez security took me into their offices and asked why I was in the heated argument with the American Communist Party leaders. They had promised me a table to put out Indian struggles, a time to speak I told them and to show a powerpoint of these struggles.
After viewing my powerpoint, they stated if they had seen it 10 minutes earlier, it would have been the back drop for President Chavez speech on US imperialism. They quickly apologized for the way that I had been treated by the USA Communist and asked if I would join the special seats by President Chavez.
They asked if I was hungry, (YES I was) and brought me food. From up on the platform by Chavez I turned and saw all the communists and flipped them the bird.
President Chavez started his speech.
Later, when back home, I was contacted by the Venezuelan Embassy and asked what I thought of their country. I had seen great efforts for the poor and great respect for indigenous people, and I asked if they could share their wealth in heating oil for the tribes and poor in the USA.
President Chavez accepted this challenge and had Citgo oil company of Venezuela work with Embassy staff to implement. They called me one night in December 2005 and asked which tribes were ready to receive and I directed them to the 4 tribes of Maine as the first to receive what would eventually be part of the 40 million gallons of heating oil to tribes and poor across USA. That was the ally we had!

Copyright © 2013 Censored News.

[Photo: Hugo Chavez. (© Robert Free Galvan)]

February 7, 2013

fotojournalismus:

Poor in cages show dark side of Hong Kong boom

For many of the richest people in Hong Kong, one of Asia’s wealthiest cities, home is a mansion with an expansive view from the heights of Victoria Peak. For some of the poorest, like Leung Cho-yin, home is a metal cage.

The 67-year-old former butcher pays 1,300 Hong Kong dollars ($167) a month for one of about a dozen wire mesh cages resembling rabbit hutches crammed into a dilapidated apartment in a gritty, working-class West Kowloon neighbourhood.

While cage homes, which sprang up in the 1950s to cater mostly to single men coming in from mainland China, are becoming rarer, other types of substandard housing such as cubicle apartments are growing as more families are pushed into poverty. Nearly 1.19 million people were living in poverty in the first half of last year, up from 1.15 million in 2011, according to the Hong Kong Council Of Social Services. There’s no official poverty line but it’s generally defined as half of the city’s median income of HK$12,000 ($1,550) a month.

Many poor residents have applied for public housing but face years of waiting. Nearly three-quarters of 500 low-income families questioned by Oxfam Hong Kong in a recent survey had been on the list for more than 4 years without being offered a flat. [Read More]

Photos : 62-year-old Cheng Man Wai lies in the 16 square foot cage that he calls home, 63-year-old Lee Tat-fong walks in a corridor while her two grandchildren — Amy, 9, and Steven, 13 — sit in their 50-square-foot room, 77-year-old Yeung Ying Biu eats next to his cage and Yeung Ying Biu sits inside his cage home on Jan. 25, 2013 in Hong Kong.

[Credit : Vincent Yu/AP]

February 5, 2013
fotojournalismus:

An Afghan woman begs for alms as she sits on a slush-filled road as snow falls in Kabul on February 4, 2013. As winter sets in across Central Asia, many Afghans struggle to provide adequate food and shelter for their families.
[Credit : Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images]

fotojournalismus:

An Afghan woman begs for alms as she sits on a slush-filled road as snow falls in Kabul on February 4, 2013. As winter sets in across Central Asia, many Afghans struggle to provide adequate food and shelter for their families.

[Credit : Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images]

February 2, 2013
Europe is haunted by the myth of the lazy mob | The Guardian
It suits the wealthy to turn the debate about poverty into a morality tale, but the reality is that inequality is structural
By Ha-Joon Chang
The Guardian
January 29, 2013
"A spectre is haunting Europe." Thus began the famous opening passages of The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels.
Today, once again, Europe is haunted by a spectre. But, unlike back in 1848 when Marx and Engels wrote those passages, it is not communism, but laziness.
Gone are the days when the upper classes were terrified of the angry mob wanting to smash their skulls and confiscate their properties. Now their biggest enemy is the army of lazy bums, whose lifestyle of indolence and hedonism, financed by crippling taxes on the rich, is sucking the lifeblood out of the economy.
In Britain, the coalition government constantly slags off those welfare slobs in the working class suburbs, sleeping off their hard night’s slog with Sky Sports and online casino. It is their shameless demand for “something for nothing”, pandered to by the previous Labour government, we are told, that has created the huge deficits that the country is struggling to get rid of.
In the eurozone, many believe that its fiscal crisis can be ultimately traced back to those lazy Mediterranean types in Greece and Spain, who had lived off hard-working Germans and Dutch, spending their time sipping espresso and playing card games. Unless those people start working hard, it is said, the eurozone’s problems cannot be fixed.
The problem with this story is that it is, well, just a story.
First of all, it is important to reiterate that the fiscal deficits in the European countries, including Britain, are largely due to the fall in tax revenues following the finance-induced recession, rather than to the rise in welfare spending. So, attacking the poor and eviscerating the welfare state is not going to cure the underlying cause of the deficits.
Moreover, on the whole, poorer people typically work harder. They usually work in jobs with longer hours and tougher working conditions. Except for a tiny minority, they are poor despite the welfare state, not because of it.
The point comes into a sharper relief, if we compare nations. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, people in Greece, that famous nation of skivers, worked on average 2,032 hours in 2011 – only a shade less than the supposedly workaholic South Koreans (2,090 hours). In the same year, the Germans worked only 70% as long (1,413 hours), while the Netherlands was officially the “laziest” nation in the world, with only 1,379 hours of work per year. These numbers tell us that, whatever else is wrong with Greece, it is not the laziness of their people.
Now, if the laziness story has such flimsy bases in reality, why is it so widely believed? It is because, in the past three decades of dominance by free-market ideology, many of us have come to believe in the myth of the individual fully in charge of his/her destiny.
Starting from Disney animations we watch as young children telling us that “if you believed in yourself, you can achieve anything”, we are bombarded with the message that individuals, and they alone, are responsible for what they get in their lives. This is what I call the L’Oreal principle – if some people are paid tens of millions of pounds a year, it must be because they’re “worth it”; if others are poor, it must be because they are either not good enough or not trying hard enough.
Now, it is politically difficult to criticise the poor for their incompetence, so the attack is focused on the mythical lazy slob, who has no moral leg to stand on. But then the end result is the dismantling of a whole set of policies and institutions that help all poor people in the name of punishing the lazy.
The beauty of this worldview – for those who disproportionately benefit from the current system – is that, by reducing everything down to individuals, it draws people’s attention away from the structural causes of poverty and inequality.
It is well known that poor childhood nutrition, lack of learning stimulus at deprived homes, and sub-par schools restrict capability developments of poor children, diminishing their future prospects. When they grow up, they have to contend with all sorts of prejudices that constantly discourage and deflate them, especially if they have the wrong gender or the wrong skin colour.
With these sandbags on their legs, the poor find it difficult to win the race even in the fairest market. Markets are frequently rigged in favour of the rich, as we have seen from a series of recent scandals surrounding deliberate mis-selling of financial products, lies told to the regulators, to the rigging of the Libor rate.
More importantly, money gives the super-rich the power even to rewrite the basic rules of the game by – let’s not mince our words – buying up politicians and political offices (think of all those former banker-turned-US treasury secretaries). Many deregulations of the financial and the labour market, as well as tax cuts for the rich, in the last three decades are results of such money politics.
By turning the debate into a morality tale of laziness, the rich and powerful can divert people’s attention away from all of these structural problems that create more poverty and inequality than is necessary.
All of this is not to say that individual talents and efforts should not be rewarded. Attempts to completely suppress them can create societies that are ostensibly equal but fundamentally unfair, as in the former socialist countries.
However, it is vital to recognise that poverty and inequality also have structural causes and start a real debate on how to change those things. Ridding the debate of the pernicious and baseless myth of the lazy mob is an important first step in that direction.
Copyright © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited.
[Photograph © Justin Lane/EPA]

Europe is haunted by the myth of the lazy mob | The Guardian

It suits the wealthy to turn the debate about poverty into a morality tale, but the reality is that inequality is structural

By Ha-Joon Chang

The Guardian

January 29, 2013

"A spectre is haunting Europe." Thus began the famous opening passages of The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels.

Today, once again, Europe is haunted by a spectre. But, unlike back in 1848 when Marx and Engels wrote those passages, it is not communism, but laziness.

Gone are the days when the upper classes were terrified of the angry mob wanting to smash their skulls and confiscate their properties. Now their biggest enemy is the army of lazy bums, whose lifestyle of indolence and hedonism, financed by crippling taxes on the rich, is sucking the lifeblood out of the economy.

In Britain, the coalition government constantly slags off those welfare slobs in the working class suburbs, sleeping off their hard night’s slog with Sky Sports and online casino. It is their shameless demand for “something for nothing”, pandered to by the previous Labour government, we are told, that has created the huge deficits that the country is struggling to get rid of.

In the eurozone, many believe that its fiscal crisis can be ultimately traced back to those lazy Mediterranean types in Greece and Spain, who had lived off hard-working Germans and Dutch, spending their time sipping espresso and playing card games. Unless those people start working hard, it is said, the eurozone’s problems cannot be fixed.

The problem with this story is that it is, well, just a story.

First of all, it is important to reiterate that the fiscal deficits in the European countries, including Britain, are largely due to the fall in tax revenues following the finance-induced recession, rather than to the rise in welfare spending. So, attacking the poor and eviscerating the welfare state is not going to cure the underlying cause of the deficits.

Moreover, on the whole, poorer people typically work harder. They usually work in jobs with longer hours and tougher working conditions. Except for a tiny minority, they are poor despite the welfare state, not because of it.

The point comes into a sharper relief, if we compare nations. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, people in Greece, that famous nation of skivers, worked on average 2,032 hours in 2011 – only a shade less than the supposedly workaholic South Koreans (2,090 hours). In the same year, the Germans worked only 70% as long (1,413 hours), while the Netherlands was officially the “laziest” nation in the world, with only 1,379 hours of work per year. These numbers tell us that, whatever else is wrong with Greece, it is not the laziness of their people.

Now, if the laziness story has such flimsy bases in reality, why is it so widely believed? It is because, in the past three decades of dominance by free-market ideology, many of us have come to believe in the myth of the individual fully in charge of his/her destiny.

Starting from Disney animations we watch as young children telling us that “if you believed in yourself, you can achieve anything”, we are bombarded with the message that individuals, and they alone, are responsible for what they get in their lives. This is what I call the L’Oreal principle – if some people are paid tens of millions of pounds a year, it must be because they’re “worth it”; if others are poor, it must be because they are either not good enough or not trying hard enough.

Now, it is politically difficult to criticise the poor for their incompetence, so the attack is focused on the mythical lazy slob, who has no moral leg to stand on. But then the end result is the dismantling of a whole set of policies and institutions that help all poor people in the name of punishing the lazy.

The beauty of this worldview – for those who disproportionately benefit from the current system – is that, by reducing everything down to individuals, it draws people’s attention away from the structural causes of poverty and inequality.

It is well known that poor childhood nutrition, lack of learning stimulus at deprived homes, and sub-par schools restrict capability developments of poor children, diminishing their future prospects. When they grow up, they have to contend with all sorts of prejudices that constantly discourage and deflate them, especially if they have the wrong gender or the wrong skin colour.

With these sandbags on their legs, the poor find it difficult to win the race even in the fairest market. Markets are frequently rigged in favour of the rich, as we have seen from a series of recent scandals surrounding deliberate mis-selling of financial products, lies told to the regulators, to the rigging of the Libor rate.

More importantly, money gives the super-rich the power even to rewrite the basic rules of the game by – let’s not mince our words – buying up politicians and political offices (think of all those former banker-turned-US treasury secretaries). Many deregulations of the financial and the labour market, as well as tax cuts for the rich, in the last three decades are results of such money politics.

By turning the debate into a morality tale of laziness, the rich and powerful can divert people’s attention away from all of these structural problems that create more poverty and inequality than is necessary.

All of this is not to say that individual talents and efforts should not be rewarded. Attempts to completely suppress them can create societies that are ostensibly equal but fundamentally unfair, as in the former socialist countries.

However, it is vital to recognise that poverty and inequality also have structural causes and start a real debate on how to change those things. Ridding the debate of the pernicious and baseless myth of the lazy mob is an important first step in that direction.

Copyright © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited.

[Photograph © Justin Lane/EPA]

December 25, 2012

October 8, 2011

Dominican Republic

(Source: miker8, via lebanesepoppyseed)

August 19, 2011
The rich really are different, and not in a good way

of-great-importance:

brosephstalin:

Psychologist and social scientist Dacher Keltner says the rich really are different, and not in a good way: Their life experience makes them less empathetic, less altruistic, and generally more selfish.

In fact, he says, the philosophical battle over economics, taxes, debt ceilings and defaults that are now roiling the stock market is partly rooted in an upper class “ideology of self-interest.”

“We have now done 12 separate studies measuring empathy in every way imaginable, social behavior in every way, and some work on compassion and it’s the same story,” he said. “Lower class people just show more empathy, more prosocial behavior, more compassion, no matter how you look at it.”

(Click Through for Full Story)

Newsflash!

Rich people don’t give a shit about you.