July 2, 2013
*** TRIGGER WARNING: Graphic Violence, Homicide, Torture, Rape, Sexual Violence, Sexual Assault, Sexual Abuse, Physical Abuse, Psychological Abuse, Humiliation ***
the-lone-pamphleteer:

No Accountability for Military Contractor’s Role in Abu Ghraib Torture, Federal Judge Says
Yesterday, a United States district court dismissed a case brought on behalf of four Iraqi men who were tortured at Abu Ghraib. The men were suing CACI Premier Technology, Inc., a private, U.S.-based contractor that U.S. military investigators concluded had participated in torture and other “sadistic, blatant, and wanton criminal abuses” of detainees at Abu Ghraib.
In dismissing the torture victims’ claims, the district judge did not suggest that the plaintiffs’ allegations of torture or a conspiracy involving CACI were unfounded. Instead, the judge held that, pursuant to the recent Supreme Court case Kiobel v. Shell/Royal Dutch Petroleum, individuals can no longer sue U.S. corporations for human rights abuses committed abroad.
At Abu Ghraib, the detainees were subjected to electric shocks, sexual violence, forced nudity, broken bones, and deprivation of oxygen, food, and water. U.S. military investigators concluded that several CACI employees serving as interrogators directed abuse of Abu Ghraib employees in order to “soften” them up for interrogations. 
CACI and the contractors it employs are completely unaccountable in U.S. court for the atrocities they committed at Abu Ghraib, despite the fact that CACI is a U.S.-based corporation, it conspired with U.S. soldiers to commit war crimes that were punished in U.S. courts martials, and the torture and war crimes occurred at a time when the United States exercised total jurisdiction and control over Abu Ghraib prison.
The decision was announced yesterday, on the International Day in Support of Torture Victims.
Facts and quotes from CCR Press ReleasePhoto from wired.com

*** TRIGGER WARNING: Graphic Violence, Homicide, Torture, Rape, Sexual Violence, Sexual Assault, Sexual Abuse, Physical Abuse, Psychological Abuse, Humiliation ***

the-lone-pamphleteer:

No Accountability for Military Contractor’s Role in Abu Ghraib Torture, Federal Judge Says

Yesterday, a United States district court dismissed a case brought on behalf of four Iraqi men who were tortured at Abu Ghraib. The men were suing CACI Premier Technology, Inc., a private, U.S.-based contractor that U.S. military investigators concluded had participated in torture and other “sadistic, blatant, and wanton criminal abuses” of detainees at Abu Ghraib.

In dismissing the torture victims’ claims, the district judge did not suggest that the plaintiffs’ allegations of torture or a conspiracy involving CACI were unfounded. Instead, the judge held that, pursuant to the recent Supreme Court case Kiobel v. Shell/Royal Dutch Petroleum, individuals can no longer sue U.S. corporations for human rights abuses committed abroad.

At Abu Ghraib, the detainees were subjected to electric shocks, sexual violence, forced nudity, broken bones, and deprivation of oxygen, food, and water. U.S. military investigators concluded that several CACI employees serving as interrogators directed abuse of Abu Ghraib employees in order to “soften” them up for interrogations.

CACI and the contractors it employs are completely unaccountable in U.S. court for the atrocities they committed at Abu Ghraib, despite the fact that CACI is a U.S.-based corporation, it conspired with U.S. soldiers to commit war crimes that were punished in U.S. courts martials, and the torture and war crimes occurred at a time when the United States exercised total jurisdiction and control over Abu Ghraib prison.

The decision was announced yesterday, on the International Day in Support of Torture Victims.

Facts and quotes from CCR Press Release
Photo from wired.com

June 11, 2013
*** TRIGGER WARNING: RAPE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, SEXUAL VIOLENCE ***
Rape of Iraqi Women by US Forces as Weapon of War: Photos and Data Emerge | Asian Tribune
By Daya Gamage, US National Correspondent Asian Tribune
October 3, 2009
In March 2006 four US soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division gang raped a 14 year old Iraqi girl and murdered her and her family —including a 5 year old child. An additional soldier was involved in the cover-up.
One of the killers, Steven Green, was found guilty on May 07, 2009 in the US District Court of Paducah and is now awaiting sentencing.
The leaked Public Affairs Guidance put the 101st media team into a “passive posture” — withholding information where possible. It conceals presence of both child victims, and describes the rape victim, who had just turned 14, as “a young woman”.
The US Army’s Criminal Investigation Division did not begin its investigation until three and a half months after the crime, news reports at that time commented.
This is not the only grim picture coming out of Iraq U.S. forces being accused of using rape as a war weapon.
The release, by CBS News, of the photographs showing the heinous sexual abuse and torture of Iraqi POW’s at the notorious Abu Ghraib prison opened a Pandora’s Box for the Bush regime wrote Ernesto Cienfuegos in La Voz de Aztlan on May 2, 2004.
Journalist Cienfuegos further states “Apparently, the suspended US commander of the prison where the worst abuses took place, Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, has refused to take the fall by herself and has implicated the CIA, Military Intelligence and private US government contractors in the torturing of POW’s and in the raping of Iraqi women detainees as well.”
Brigadier General Karpinski, who commanded the 800th Military Police Brigade, described a high-pressure Military Intelligence and CIA command that prized successful interrogations. A month before the alleged abuses and rapes occurred, she said, a team of CIA, Military Intelligence officers and private consultants under the employ of the US government came to Abu Ghraib. “Their main and specific mission was to give the interrogators new techniques to get more information from detainees,” she said.
At least one picture shows an American soldier apparently raping a female prisoner while another is said to show a male translator raping a male detainee.
Further photographs are said to depict sexual assaults on prisoners with objects including a truncheon, wire and a phosphorescent tube.
Another apparently shows a female prisoner having her clothing forcibly removed to expose her breasts.
Detail of the content emerged from Major General Antonio Taguba, the former army officer who conducted an inquiry into the Abu Ghraib jail in Iraq.
Allegations of rape and abuse were included in his 2004 report but the fact there were photographs was never revealed. He later confirmed their existence in an interview with the Daily Telegraph in May 2009.
The London newspaper further noted “graphic nature of some of the images may explain the US President Obama’s attempts to block the release of an estimated 2,000 photographs from prisons in Iraq and Afghanistan despite an earlier promise to allow them to be published.”
Maj. Gen. Taguba, who retired in January 2007, said he supported the President’s decision, adding: “These pictures show torture, abuse, rape and every indecency.
“The mere description of these pictures is horrendous enough, take my word for it.”
In April, Mr. Obama’s administration said the photographs would be released and it would be “pointless to appeal” against a court judgment in favor of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).
But after lobbying from senior military figures, Mr. Obama changed his mind saying they could put the safety of troops at risk.
In May, he said: “The most direct consequence of releasing them, I believe, would be to inflame anti-American public opinion and to put our troops in greater danger.”
In April 2004, new photographs were sent to La Voz de Aztlan from confidential sources depicting the shocking rapes of two Iraqi women by what are purported to be US Military Intelligence personnel and private US mercenaries in military fatigues. It is now known, Cienfuegos wrote in May 2004, that hundreds of these photographs had been in circulation among the troops in Iraq. The graphic photos were being swapped between the soldiers like baseball cards.
Asian Tribune carries here three of the ‘Rape’ photographs which have brought criticism that the U.S. forces in Iraq have used rape as a weapon of war.
Copyright © 2009 Asian Tribune.
[Related articles:- Women, Men and Children Are Routinely Tortured and Raped in Iraqi Prisons. The Perpetrators Walk Free | iraqispringmc, November 27, 2012- Privileges of New Democratic Iraq: Rape & Torture of Innocent Women in Maliki’s Prisons | uruknet.info, February 6, 2013- For Iraqi women, America’s promise of democracy is anything but liberation | guardian.co.uk, February 25, 2013- Iraq, 2013: The Horrors Remain the Same — Rape, Executions and Torture Abound | Alternet, March 18, 2013- Reports surface of rape and torture in Iraq | Women Under Siege Project, March 20, 2013]

*** TRIGGER WARNING: RAPE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, SEXUAL VIOLENCE ***

Rape of Iraqi Women by US Forces as Weapon of War: Photos and Data Emerge | Asian Tribune

By Daya Gamage, US National Correspondent Asian Tribune

October 3, 2009

In March 2006 four US soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division gang raped a 14 year old Iraqi girl and murdered her and her family —including a 5 year old child. An additional soldier was involved in the cover-up.

One of the killers, Steven Green, was found guilty on May 07, 2009 in the US District Court of Paducah and is now awaiting sentencing.

The leaked Public Affairs Guidance put the 101st media team into a “passive posture” — withholding information where possible. It conceals presence of both child victims, and describes the rape victim, who had just turned 14, as “a young woman”.

The US Army’s Criminal Investigation Division did not begin its investigation until three and a half months after the crime, news reports at that time commented.

This is not the only grim picture coming out of Iraq U.S. forces being accused of using rape as a war weapon.

The release, by CBS News, of the photographs showing the heinous sexual abuse and torture of Iraqi POW’s at the notorious Abu Ghraib prison opened a Pandora’s Box for the Bush regime wrote Ernesto Cienfuegos in La Voz de Aztlan on May 2, 2004.

Journalist Cienfuegos further states “Apparently, the suspended US commander of the prison where the worst abuses took place, Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, has refused to take the fall by herself and has implicated the CIA, Military Intelligence and private US government contractors in the torturing of POW’s and in the raping of Iraqi women detainees as well.”

Brigadier General Karpinski, who commanded the 800th Military Police Brigade, described a high-pressure Military Intelligence and CIA command that prized successful interrogations. A month before the alleged abuses and rapes occurred, she said, a team of CIA, Military Intelligence officers and private consultants under the employ of the US government came to Abu Ghraib. “Their main and specific mission was to give the interrogators new techniques to get more information from detainees,” she said.

At least one picture shows an American soldier apparently raping a female prisoner while another is said to show a male translator raping a male detainee.

Further photographs are said to depict sexual assaults on prisoners with objects including a truncheon, wire and a phosphorescent tube.

Another apparently shows a female prisoner having her clothing forcibly removed to expose her breasts.

Detail of the content emerged from Major General Antonio Taguba, the former army officer who conducted an inquiry into the Abu Ghraib jail in Iraq.

Allegations of rape and abuse were included in his 2004 report but the fact there were photographs was never revealed. He later confirmed their existence in an interview with the Daily Telegraph in May 2009.

The London newspaper further noted “graphic nature of some of the images may explain the US President Obama’s attempts to block the release of an estimated 2,000 photographs from prisons in Iraq and Afghanistan despite an earlier promise to allow them to be published.”

Maj. Gen. Taguba, who retired in January 2007, said he supported the President’s decision, adding: “These pictures show torture, abuse, rape and every indecency.

“The mere description of these pictures is horrendous enough, take my word for it.”

In April, Mr. Obama’s administration said the photographs would be released and it would be “pointless to appeal” against a court judgment in favor of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

But after lobbying from senior military figures, Mr. Obama changed his mind saying they could put the safety of troops at risk.

In May, he said: “The most direct consequence of releasing them, I believe, would be to inflame anti-American public opinion and to put our troops in greater danger.”

In April 2004, new photographs were sent to La Voz de Aztlan from confidential sources depicting the shocking rapes of two Iraqi women by what are purported to be US Military Intelligence personnel and private US mercenaries in military fatigues. It is now known, Cienfuegos wrote in May 2004, that hundreds of these photographs had been in circulation among the troops in Iraq. The graphic photos were being swapped between the soldiers like baseball cards.

Asian Tribune carries here three of the ‘Rape’ photographs which have brought criticism that the U.S. forces in Iraq have used rape as a weapon of war.

Copyright © 2009 Asian Tribune.

[Related articles:
- Women, Men and Children Are Routinely Tortured and Raped in Iraqi Prisons. The Perpetrators Walk Free | iraqispringmc, November 27, 2012
- Privileges of New Democratic Iraq: Rape & Torture of Innocent Women in Maliki’s Prisons | uruknet.info, February 6, 2013
- For Iraqi women, America’s promise of democracy is anything but liberation | guardian.co.uk, February 25, 2013
- Iraq, 2013: The Horrors Remain the Same — Rape, Executions and Torture Abound | Alternet, March 18, 2013
- Reports surface of rape and torture in Iraq | Women Under Siege Project, March 20, 2013]

April 12, 2013
Is the Burmese Military Keeping Rohingya Women As Sex Slaves? | VICE United Kingdom

By Assed Baig

April 12, 2013


Regiment 207’s military camp a few miles from Sittwe.

Burma’s Muslims are still having a pretty awful time of it. Last year, the country’s Buddhist majority launched a series of attacks on the minority Rohingya Muslim population, supposedly because they’re not “ethnically pure”. The attacks have continued this year and now include the general Muslim population, as well as the ethnic Rohingyas, getting their homes burned down and heads smashed in by marauding gangs of vicious Buddhists. 

After monitoring the plight of the Rohingya and the two incidents of violence against them in June and October last year, I decided to fly out to Burma in wary anticipation of another round of trouble. The problem was that I had no money, no commission, no media organisation backing me and the mainstream media had pretty much stopped reporting on the issue. When I turned to the public to help fund my trip, the response was overwhelming (turns out people do have an interest in helping to expose the extended violent persecution of vulnerable minorities) and they collectively helped me raise enough money to go.     

We stayed in Sittwe, the main city in Arakhan state, which is where the majority of the Rohingya camps are situated. Travelling past the police check points every morning and into the Rohingya camps, it felt like being transported into a parallel world where suddenly it’s fine to forget about your obligations as a human to not be an unscrupulous bully to a group of people just because they originally come from somewhere different to you. The Rohingya Muslims aren’t recognised as citizens of Burma, meaning they have no rights and very little access to education and healthcare.


A Rohingya boy at an unregistered internally displaced person camp in Arakhan state.

While in Sittwe, some of my contacts told me about Rohingya women being kept at a military base. I tracked down some of the eyewitnesses, but I needed to get close to the camp to confirm what I’d heard. Bear in mind that taking pictures and video of a Burmese military base obviously isn’t something to be taken lightly, and the people who’d agreed to take me there risked their lives if they were caught.

The evidence I obtained during my week in Sittwe strongly implies that the Burmese military is imprisoning Rohingya women from the Arakhan region and using them as sex slaves. That evidence has been passed on to the International Labour Organisation (ILO), a United Nations agency dealing with labour issues, who have lodged a complaint to the Burmese government and launched an investigation in an attempt to rescue the women.

Eyewitness testimony of a military camp situated a few miles from Sittwe town (and home to Regiment 270) describes around 20 women and three children under the age of eight being held at the camp. One of the witnesses, Amina (name changed), described walking past the camp when she heard voices calling out to her. The imprisoned women asked Amina if she was Muslim; she is.     

“Please help us. If you can help us escape from here you will go to jannah (heaven),” one woman told her. “Many military men come, we can’t breathe. We want to become Muslim again. If we stay like this we will go to hell.” The intended meaning of what was said was, Amina felt, clear: these women are being raped, and they don’t have to say it explicitly for anyone to understand what’s taking place.

The prisoners asked Amina to pass the message on to someone who could help. “Our parents can’t find us,” they added.


A Rohingya woman at a medical clinic. Photo by Dougal Thomas.

The women only managed to speak to Amina because it was Burmese Independence Day and the soldiers were away. “We’ve been arrested here for quite a long time now. They have left us today because they have a special visitor,” they told Amina. The women continued, telling Amina that if the word was spread too much that the military would kill them, as well as warning her that she was at risk of being killed herself if she was spotted talking to them.

Amina saw three children inside the camp. Two of them popped their heads up on the windowsills and one came up to the fence so that Amina could pass through some vegetables she’d collected. “The women were crying,” she told me. “Some of them called me daughter, others called me sister.”

Amina described some of the women as pregnant, which could indicate that they’ve been prisoners since the June or October violence and have become pregnant during their imprisonment. Information relayed from various sources indicates that local villagers are aware that women are being kept as prisoners but are too scared to speak out. And as Rohingya aren’t recognised as citizens of Burma – and therefore have no rights – it’s fair to assume that the punishment inflicted on them for making these kinds of allegations wouldn’t exactly be regulated.


A Rohingya burnt to the ground in Arakhan state. Photo by Spike Johnson.

An 18-year-old Rohingya man I interviewed described another camp 20 minutes away (which is home to the medical regiment), where another woman was apparently being held under similar conditions. He was one of around 14 rice paddy workers who went to speak Rakhine with the woman, the language spoken by the Buddhist population of Arakhan. The woman replied, “Don’t speak Rakhine with me any more, I am Muslim and a prisoner here.”

She then told the men her father’s name and where she was from. They asked her what she was doing at a military camp if she was Muslim, and if she was ready to come with them. She replied, “I have two children,” implying that her children are being used to keep her at the camp. This evidence has also been passed on to the ILO.

I tracked down other eyewitnesses, but they were mostly too afraid to speak. One woman who’d seen the women imprisoned at Regiment 270’s camp initially agreed to speak to me, but backed out after her husband threatened to divorce her if she spoke to any journalists about the situation. The Rohingya have no rights or official form of protection, and those who do speak to journalists are risking their lives, so the reluctance to divulge what they know is perfectly understandable. 

The last known sighting of these women was at the end of March and it’s uncertain whether they’re still alive. It’s also uncertain if the women are still at the camp or have been split up into different camps. But what is certain is that there are innocent Rohingya women being held captive by the Burmese military and plenty of locals know about it, only it’s impossible for them to do anything about it without the threat of losing their lives. 

Follow Assed on Twitter: @AssedBaig

More stuff about Burma and the Rohingya:

I Spoke To The Woman Who Started The Rohingya Hashtag

Anonymous Taught Twitter About the Rohingya Genocide

The Burmese Aren’t Very Nice to Rohingya Muslims

Copyright © 2013 Vice Media Inc.

April 10, 2013

April Is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Get educated, and show your support!
When It Happens to a Friend
It’s an unsettling thought, yes, but the statistics bear it out. Somewhere between 17 and 28 percent of women* have been victims of rape, attempted rape, or sexual assault. According to those same sources, the numbers range from 3 to 17 percent for men.* They increase further for members of particular populations or communities, including Native American and Alaskan women; gay, lesbian, and queer folk;people with disabilities; and trans* people.

You probably know someone who’s been a victim of sexual assault.
There are many ways you can support a friend who has been sexually assaulted.

Nearly every victim, every survivor, has a first person they tell — someone they confide in to help make sense of what happened, to help begin the healing process. Unfortunately, I know too well that sometimes the first person told only compounds the hurt. So I’m writing this based on what I wish people had done for me.
How should you respond if a sexual assault survivor reaches out to you?
Believe the survivor. We live in a culture that regularly disbelieves, minimizes, and judges victims of sexual assault. Additionally, there’s a strong chance that the victim knew the attacker before the assault — and a reasonable chance that both are members of a mutual social circle or community. In this light, it can be incredibly stressful for a survivor to speak up about an assault. Simply telling that person, “I believe you,” can offer immense support and relief.
Don’t second guess the decisions a survivor made before the assault or the reactions your friend experienced during or afterward. You know the saying, “Hindsight is 20-20”? It applies here. Even if a survivor acted or reacted in a way that you personally wouldn’t have done, that doesn’t mean a particular behavior was wrong. Sexual assault can easily send someone into panic mode; therefore, responses like freezing and dissociating during an assault are very normal. Second guessing or criticizing those actions can undermine support when the survivor needs it most.
Help your friend regain as much control as is possible. Rape is a crime that seeks to assert power, dominance, and control over another. Helping a friend regain that control probably means advocating for that person to be able to make as many response- and recovery-related decisions as they can or would like to make for themselves. Again, even if the choices aren’t ones you would make for yourself, the important thing is that your friends get to prioritize according to what’s best for them. This may include choices such as:
Whether to seek medical attention: Certainly, it’s good to make sure your friend has knowledge of and access to injury care, testing for sexually transmitted diseases, and emergency contraception if applicable. However, if and when to use these services needs to be the survivor’s call.
Whether to seek crisis services or other support services: If you’re worried that your friend is in imminent danger of self-harming, calling 911 is in order. For less immediate issues, you can find contact information for Arizona sexual assault victims services here, here, and here. Again, having the information can be extremely valuable, but the decision use it — now, later, or never — belongs to the survivor.
Whether to report the crime to police or other authorities: Again, it’s great to have information on how to report. But since a person’s reasons both for and against reporting can be personal and complicated, it’s something that needs to remain your friend’s choice.
Understand that the path to recovery is individual. Some survivors cry, loudly or softly; some are visibly angry or upset; others are outwardly calm. Some wish to seek professional counseling services; some don’t. Some want to pursue criminal charges or, if applicable, other disciplinary options; others don’t. Still others are undecided and want time to weigh their options. Some want to talk about their assault a lot, either as a way of educating others or of processing it themselves; some never want to talk about it. Some survivors withdraw. Some surround themselves with others, never wanting to be alone. Still others want to resume their normal lives as quickly and fully as possible. Not only are all of these reactions normal, but it’s also common for any individual survivor to experience multiple reactions — even apparently conflicting ones — as they go through the healing process.
Understand that healing can take time. To the extent that you can, be there for your friend not just today — but weeks, months, maybe even years from now
Source.

April Is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Get educated, and show your support!

When It Happens to a Friend

It’s an unsettling thought, yes, but the statistics bear it out. Somewhere between 17 and 28 percent of women* have been victims of rape, attempted rape, or sexual assault. According to those same sources, the numbers range from 3 to 17 percent for men.* They increase further for members of particular populations or communities, including Native American and Alaskan women; gay, lesbian, and queer folk;people with disabilities; and trans* people.

You probably know someone who’s been a victim of sexual assault.


There are many ways you can support a friend who has been sexually assaulted.


Nearly every victim, every survivor, has a first person they tell — someone they confide in to help make sense of what happened, to help begin the healing process. Unfortunately, I know too well that sometimes the first person told only compounds the hurt. So I’m writing this based on what I wish people had done for me.

How should you respond if a sexual assault survivor reaches out to you?

Believe the survivor. We live in a culture that regularly disbelieves, minimizes, and judges victims of sexual assault. Additionally, there’s a strong chance that the victim knew the attacker before the assault — and a reasonable chance that both are members of a mutual social circle or community. In this light, it can be incredibly stressful for a survivor to speak up about an assault. Simply telling that person, “I believe you,” can offer immense support and relief.

Don’t second guess the decisions a survivor made before the assault or the reactions your friend experienced during or afterward. You know the saying, “Hindsight is 20-20”? It applies here. Even if a survivor acted or reacted in a way that you personally wouldn’t have done, that doesn’t mean a particular behavior was wrong. Sexual assault can easily send someone into panic mode; therefore, responses like freezing and dissociating during an assault are very normal. Second guessing or criticizing those actions can undermine support when the survivor needs it most.

Help your friend regain as much control as is possible. Rape is a crime that seeks to assert power, dominance, and control over another. Helping a friend regain that control probably means advocating for that person to be able to make as many response- and recovery-related decisions as they can or would like to make for themselves. Again, even if the choices aren’t ones you would make for yourself, the important thing is that your friends get to prioritize according to what’s best for them. This may include choices such as:

  • Whether to seek medical attention: Certainly, it’s good to make sure your friend has knowledge of and access to injury care, testing for sexually transmitted diseases, and emergency contraception if applicable. However, if and when to use these services needs to be the survivor’s call.
  • Whether to seek crisis services or other support services: If you’re worried that your friend is in imminent danger of self-harming, calling 911 is in order. For less immediate issues, you can find contact information for Arizona sexual assault victims services herehere, and here. Again, having the information can be extremely valuable, but the decision use it — now, later, or never — belongs to the survivor.
  • Whether to report the crime to police or other authorities: Again, it’s great to have information on how to report. But since a person’s reasons both for and against reporting can be personal and complicated, it’s something that needs to remain your friend’s choice.

Understand that the path to recovery is individual. Some survivors cry, loudly or softly; some are visibly angry or upset; others are outwardly calm. Some wish to seek professional counseling services; some don’t. Some want to pursue criminal charges or, if applicable, other disciplinary options; others don’t. Still others are undecided and want time to weigh their options. Some want to talk about their assault a lot, either as a way of educating others or of processing it themselves; some never want to talk about it. Some survivors withdraw. Some surround themselves with others, never wanting to be alone. Still others want to resume their normal lives as quickly and fully as possible. Not only are all of these reactions normal, but it’s also common for any individual survivor to experience multiple reactions — even apparently conflicting ones — as they go through the healing process.

Understand that healing can take time. To the extent that you can, be there for your friend not just today — but weeks, months, maybe even years from now

Source.

(via girlslovesextoo)

March 27, 2013

(via thewildcuntress)

March 21, 2013

March 21, 2013

(via slavicinferno)

March 20, 2013

(Source: hazimjaafar)

3:30am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK1xOyggIdzF
  
Filed under: Rape Rape Culture 
March 19, 2013

March 7, 2013