July 1, 2013
RITE OF PASSAGE
Boys from the Xhosa tribe underwent circumcision Sunday [June 30, 2013] near Qunu, South Africa, where former South Africa President Nelson Mandela grew up. (© Carl De Souza/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images, via WSJ)

RITE OF PASSAGE

Boys from the Xhosa tribe underwent circumcision Sunday [June 30, 2013] near Qunu, South Africa, where former South Africa President Nelson Mandela grew up. (© Carl De Souza/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images, via WSJ)

July 1, 2013

dynamicafrica:

Happy Independence Day Somalia!

On July 1st, 1960, the British and Italian parts of Somalia become independent and merged to form the United Republic of Somalia with Aden Abdullah Osman Daar elected as president.

The Horn of Africa has been home to Somalis, who make up around 85% of Somalia’s population, for centuries. For many years, Mogadishu stood as the pre-eminent city in the بلاد البربر, Bilad-al-Barbar (“Land of the Berbers”), which was the medieval Arabic term for the Horn of Africa. During the age of the Ajuuraans, the sultanates and republics of Merca, Mogadishu, Barawa, Hobyo and their respective ports flourished and had a lucrative foreign commerce with ships sailing to and coming from Arabia, India, Venetia, Persia, Egypt, Portugal and as far away as China. Vasco da Gama, who passed by Mogadishu in the 15th century, noted that it was a large city with houses of four or five storeys high and big palaces in its centre and many mosques with cylindrical minarets.

From the 7th to the 10th century, Arab and Persian trading posts were established along the coast of present-day Somalia. Nomadic tribes occupied the interior, occasionally pushing into Ethiopian territory. In the 16th century, Turkish rule extended to the northern coast, and the sultans of Zanzibar gained control in the south.

After British occupation of Aden in 1839, the Somali coast became its source of food. The French established a coal-mining station in 1862 at the site of Djibouti, and the Italians planted a settlement in Eritrea. Egypt, which for a time claimed Turkish rights in the area, was succeeded by Britain. By 1920, a British and an Italian protectorate occupied what is now Somalia. The British ruled the entire area after 1941, with Italy returning in 1950 to serve as United Nations trustee for its former territory.

By 1960, Britain and Italy granted independence to their respective sectors, enabling the two to join as the Republic of Somalia on July 1, 1960. Somalia broke diplomatic relations with Britain in 1963 when the British granted the Somali-populated Northern Frontier District of Kenya to the Republic of Kenya.

On Oct. 15, 1969, President Abdi Rashid Ali Shermarke was assassinated and the army seized power. Maj. Gen. Mohamed Siad Barre, as president of a renamed Somali Democratic Republic, leaned heavily toward the USSR. In 1977, Somalia openly backed rebels in the easternmost area of Ethiopia, the Ogaden Desert, which had been seized by Ethiopia at the turn of the century. Somalia acknowledged defeat in an eight-month war against the Ethiopians that year, having lost much of its 32,000-man army and most of its tanks and planes. President Siad Barre fled the country in late Jan. 1991. His departure left Somalia in the hands of a number of clan-based guerrilla groups, none of which trusted each other.

(sources 1; 2)

June 28, 2013
fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Pretoria, South Africa: Workers and students protest the visit of U.S. President Barack Obama, June 28, 2013. One said he viewed Obama as a “disappointment” and thought Nelson Mandela would too.
Great, great signs!

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Pretoria, South Africa: Workers and students protest the visit of U.S. President Barack Obama, June 28, 2013. One said he viewed Obama as a “disappointment” and thought Nelson Mandela would too.

Great, great signs!

June 26, 2013
SENEGAL. Touba. 1988. Hands of a Muslim woman decorated with henna. by Abbas

SENEGAL. Touba. 1988. Hands of a Muslim woman decorated with henna. by Abbas

June 24, 2013

iluvsouthernafrica:

Namibians wearing Vellies (Shoes)

“Velskoen, pronounced “fell-skoon” and known colloquially as “vellies,” are the ancestor of the modern-day desert boot. Vellies were first made in the 1600s, inspired by the footwear of the Khoikhoi tribe and crafted using raw materials. Later, our vellies were adapted by British travellers, packaged and renamed to be what we now know as desert boots.

(Brother Vellies) are made in the coastal town of Swakopmund, Namibia. There, a small group of eight Damara gentlemen assemble every shoe by hand, turning out just 20 pairs an afternoon.

…Vellies are made of vegetable-dyed Kudu leather. The Namibian government mandates the culling of these large native antelope to control their population. Kudu skin yields amazingly durable leather and suede that ages exceptionally well. Because these hides are taken from wild animals they often show scars or other “imperfections” that domesticated hides do not.” Brothervellies

June 16, 2013
Valentine with her daughters Amélie and Inez, Rwanda. by Jonathan Torgovnik

Valentine with her daughters Amélie and Inez, Rwanda. by Jonathan Torgovnik

April 13, 2013
mpdrolet:

Ivory Coast
Luca J. Sage

mpdrolet:

Ivory Coast

Luca J. Sage

April 12, 2013
vintagenatgeographic:

A vendor peddling wax prints in Lome, Togo
National Geographic | June 1994

vintagenatgeographic:

A vendor peddling wax prints in Lome, Togo

National Geographic | June 1994

April 6, 2013
entrelacave:

Mali Boys

entrelacave:

Mali Boys

April 5, 2013

blue-voids:

Tim Hetherington - Inner Light: Portraits of the Blind, Sierra Leone (1999-2003)